This Week in Landscape | 23 September 2012

The weekly round-up of landscape and built-environment links from around the web

Sydney’s headland honcho | Anthony Dennis | Sydney Morning Herald
”You think of an architect,” he says. ”He gets a building built and it’s very photogenic. You think of a landscape architect and 10 to 15 years later it’s ready to be photographed. So the older I get, the harder it is to think 10 to 15 years [ahead]. On the other hand, if you get projects of some quality, they plant bigger trees, so you don’t have to wait so long.” – Peter Walker

How to sow your own exotic meadow | Sarah Raven | The Telegraph
Garden designer Tom Stuart-Smith has used his expertise to create an exotic, smaller-scale version of the Olympic wildflower meadows.

And what about the trees that made way for Endeavour? | LA Times
400-plus trees that are being cut down to make way for the space shuttle’s journey from LAX

Where people find their place: Currents in landscape architecture | David Motzen-Becker | South West Journal
If I could only find a place to articulate why my profession is so unusually prescient, it would help people understand and value what landscape architects right here in Minnesota are accomplishing.

UNEP to Train Blue Helmets on Environmental Challenges to Peace and Security | UNEP
A new training programme to support the UN’s 16 peace operations in improving their management of the environment and natural resources has been launched by the United Nations Environment Programme.

The Bicycle Revolution: Once and Future King of Transport | The Coolist*
In a few short decades, the automobile had re-written the map in the United States, as long roads separated residences from retail, and highways connected cities to cities and states to states. This vehicular revolution was assumed to replace the bicycle, but the bicycle is still very much alive.

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