This Week In Landscape | 1 September 2013

Another week of landscape links from around the world. Send your news, links and events to contribute@worldlandscapearchitect.com

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Infrared Image New York | Image Credit Nickolay Lamm @ Storagefront.com

Infrared Photos Reveal the Brutal Urban Heatscape | Wired  When summer temperatures rise to uncomfortable levels, cities take a bigger beating than the rest of the landscape. This urban heat effect is especially brutal in big, dense, concrete-dominated cities like New York.

Local landscape architect calls for improved landscape quality | James Qualtrough | Isle News
“‘It’s never been more important to plant trees in gardens, streets and parks. We need to introduce better planning and management of our green areas to encourage more people to take action.”

Native plants are a priority | Rebecca Trigger | The West Australian
Landscape architects are looking to native species as they manage restricted water access in a drying climate.

Delhi’s upcoming park to rival New York’s Central Park | The Economic Times
“In a tangle of forgotten, overgrown brush in the heart of India’s capital, a quiet plan has been hatched to change the landscape of one of the world’s most populous cities.An intricate Mughal garden is being created.”

Continue reading This Week In Landscape | 1 September 2013

In Situ Estate Garden | Redding USA | AHBL

In Situ Estate Garden | Redding USA | AHBL
At its core, In Situ is a study in restoration, both of the site and the mind. Functionally designed as a garden for entertaining, this eight acre retreat in rural Connecticut incorporates sculptural art, exterior fire features, multiple water features, and several areas for outdoor dining. These luxuries are subtly coordinated with an ambitious site restoration program.

Continue reading In Situ Estate Garden | Redding USA | AHBL

The Edge Park | Brooklyn USA | W Architecture & Landscape Architecture

The Edge Park Brooklyn

The vision of W Architecture and Landscape Architecture (also known for the West Harlem Piers Park), was to create places of interaction that form a lasting connection between people and their environments. The Edge Park emphasizes the confrontation of forces at the water’s edge and encourages public use. Here, the city grid and the river’s ecosystem converge, mingle, and clash: the road turns into a pedestrian greenway, a garage is surmounted with a sloping lawn, piers reach gently into the water from deep within the park and stone riverbank contrasts with concrete bulkhead. This blurring of the boundaries between land and water extends the waterfront benefits inland into the community. The various seating areas within the park are positioned as if they have been scattered by the river’s current. The central seating area directs the entire park towards the stunning view of the Empire State Building.
Continue reading The Edge Park | Brooklyn USA | W Architecture & Landscape Architecture

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