This Week In Landscape | 16 June 2013

Taksim Square - Gezi Park Protests, İstanbul | IMAGE CREDIT | Alan Hilditch

Taksim Square – Gezi Park Protests, İstanbul | IMAGE CREDIT | Alan Hilditch

 

Turkish Prime Minister Is Practicing Landscape Architecture Without a License | Professor Sadik Artunc, FASLA, RLA | The Dirt
“The proposed plans do not seem to give even a cursory thought to the needs of pedestrians. They do not offer any significant design elements for the human scale. Perhaps another unstated objective of the PM is to minimize and eventually remove the monument to the Independence War…”

Landscape architect Peter Walker, who designed the Nasher garden, strongly denounces Museum Tower and its ownership | mgranberry | Dallas News
“Peter Walker, the much-heralded landscape architect, who designed the garden of the Nasher Sculpture Center, came out ferociously in defense of his project on Thursday.”

Researcher to study, develop public ‘healing spaces’ | Cornell Cornicle
“A Cornell researcher leads a team that was recently awarded a $750,000 National Open Spaces Sacred Places (OSSP) Award from the TKF Foundation to design, build and research spaces in Joplin, Mo., and in the New York City metropolitan area – that will focus on healing aspects of the human-nature interaction in the wake of disaster.”

Portland’s new tree code is a wise investment in our urban forest: Guest opinion | Meryl Redisch | Oregon Live
“Building the new tree code involved more than five years of work, city resources and community participation. The explicit goals set by citizen stakeholders for developing a new code were to streamline regulations, improve customer service, protect trees better during development and in general, and ensure compliance.”

Building Hyperdensity and Civic Delight | Vishaan Chakrabarti | Design Observer
“Sound urban development is the lynchpin of the hyperdense environment. Yet public advocacy for high-density development is extraordinarily low, primarily because its merits are misunderstood.”

Atkins to develop Eco-Low Carbon Urban Planning Guidance in China | Atkins
“Atkins has won an important new commission to develop guidance for eco-low carbon (ELC) urban planning in China. Funded by the UK’s Foreign and Commonwealth Office Prosperity Fund and led by Atkins’ sustainable planning team in Beijing, the project involves working with both national government agencies and city governments and is aimed at providing a key, high profile reference point for ELC urban planning in China. ”

Ten Sustainable Ideas to Transform Cities | This Big City
Sustainia 100 is a catalogue of transformative ideas for sustainability – a “one-stop toolbox for sustainable solutions,” if you will. A new ‘toolbox’ is put together annually by the Danish organisation Sustainia,

NYC presents the City’s long-term plan to further prepare for the impacts of a changing climate
“A Stronger, More Resilient New York”, a comprehensive plan that contains actionable recommendations both for rebuilding the communities impacted by Sandy and increasing the resilience of infrastructure and buildings citywide.”

IMAGE CREDIT | Taksim Square – Gezi Park Protests, İstanbul | by Flickr User Alan Hilditch

Canterbury Cathedral Landscape Design Competition


Canterbury Cathedral is England’s first Cathedral and Mother Church; it welcomes over a million visitors a year. The Canterbury Cathedral Landscape Design Competition is an exciting initiative, which seeks to find the best design team to re-imagine and reinvigorate the existing setting. It is a rare opportunity to bring fresh thinking and new ideas to the landscape of one of England’s most famous buildings.

Continue reading Canterbury Cathedral Landscape Design Competition

HASSELL lights the way to Walsh Bay for Vivid Sydney

Field of Colour

Vivid Sydney is an annual creative festival of light, music and ideas that each night transforms Sydney Harbour and its iconic architecture and public spaces into a canvas for spectacular light installations. This year, designers and artists from Australia and around the world have created 60 installations, including four HASSELL-supported works that feature in the Walsh Bay precinct – the location of the newly-opened HASSELL studio.
Continue reading HASSELL lights the way to Walsh Bay for Vivid Sydney

WLA | Calls for Submissions


WLA Landscape Architecture Magazine is about to undergo a reformat and relaunch for edition 09. WLA will include selected projects that have been published on World Landscape Architecture with added images, information and background to each project. WLA will also include more reviews and interviews for readers. WLA 09 will have an improved format that will be easier to read and navigate.

We are looking for great conceptual and built projects from design studios, firms, freelancers, students from across the world. Submissions would preferably be designed or completed in the last 12 months. Its easy to submit a project and we look forward to seeing some interesting and diverse work.

How to submit your project?

1. Select your 5 to 10  best images  with a minimum 800 pixels wide at 75 dpi in jpg format.

2. Write 500-750 words about the project.

3.  List the project name, location, design firm, year and credits for the images and text.

4. Include a note stating that you or the company  “own the copyright to the project, images and text and give World Landscape Architecture the right to publish the work digitally and/or in hard copy format.”

5. Email the files and text to submit@worldlandscapearchitect.com with the subject “WLA09
Please send any files larger that 10mb via wetransfer.com or yousendit.com

DEADLINE | June 30th 11:59PM Honolulu Time

This Week in Landscape | 2 June 2013

Another week of great landscape content on the web. Here are our picks of the week…

Urbanism and the Landscape Architect | Mark Hough | Planetizen
“Landscape architects are not given nearly enough recognition for being urbanists.”

How Big Is That Park? City Now Has the Answer | Lisa W. Foderaro | NY Times
“Over the last three years, the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation has been remeasuring every park in the system”

Edible Bus Stop opens as part of Chelsea Fringe | Landscape Institute
“The newly opened Edible Bus Stop on Lambeth’s Landor Road, is the first of the capital’s ‘pocket parks’ to be completed with matched funding from the Mayor’s Pocket Park Programme.”

City Shaping VI: In 21st Century Toronto, There is Momentum | Charles A. Birnbaum | Huffington Post
“As part of this transformation, what’s particularly noteworthy is Toronto’s use of landscape architecture as a development catalyst, especially along the city’s waterfront.”

The City and the Sea | Tom Vanderbilt | PLACES
“And as Hurricane Sandy showed, the sea will not be forgotten. At a parking lot under the FDR Drive, where a few months earlier I had queued for locally sourced tacos at the New Amsterdam Market, Craft told me the water would have been over our heads.”

Landscape Architect Finds Her Creativity Working In A Small Space | Bill Motchan | The Chicago Architecture Blog
“I love working with clients and learning their vision so I get to execute their vision,” she said.”

Renderings Revealed for Main Street at Brooklyn Bridge Park | Jessica Dailey | Curbed NY
Brooklyn Bridge Park’s plans for expansion of its Main Street section were unveiled at a recent community board meeting.

Designing cities for better health: If you build it, they will walk | Dave McGinn | The Globe and Mail
“Many Canadian cities have also officially adopted the new urban planning thinking, especially Toronto, where the public health department released a report in 2011 on how communities shape the health of residents….”

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