Mud Lick Creek Project Fights Erosion, Pollution – Science – redOrbit

A half-million-dollar plan to re-engineer and protect Mud Lick Creek is designed to enhance what is one of Roanoke County’s most popular parks.

County Engineer George Simpson led a discussion Monday morning with 30 to 40 people at Garst Mill Park on a project to fight erosion and pollution of the creek there.

Approximately 3,000 linear feet of Mud Lick Creek run through the park, making it one of the park’s most prominent features and one that’s especially popular with children, who wade in it.

The project, which the county is calling a “restoration,” is a pilot, Simpson said, attempting to re-create the natural contours of the stream. Similar programs may be attempted in other watersheds threatened by pollution and erosion if this one is successful.

SOURCE: redOrbitMud Lick Creek Project Fights Erosion, Pollution – Science –

Los Altos looking for a new look

A new development, such as an office and retail building or landscaping enhancement, doesn’t suddenly appear by magic, although it may seem that way to citizens who are not paying attention. There’s often a long process, including planning, negotiating and compromising among developers and city officials, followed by city meetings and public hearings as builders struggle to meet city requirements. The first draft of a plan is rarely, if ever, the last.

Loyola Corners – This shopping district that traces back to Los Altos’ early days may receive a makeover. Responding to safety concerns and complaints of lack of aesthetics, the city has employed landscape architect David Gates to draft a Loyola Corners beautification plan – repairing and adding new sidewalks, adding landscaping and repainting streetlights black.

The project is in the “very early stages right now,” Assistant City Manager James Walgren said.

SOURCE: Los Altos Town Crier » Behind the scenes.

Urban Farmer II – Vancouver Sun

Neophyte farmer Nicholas Read is spending the summer learning how to grow food. With the help of City Farm Boy Ward Teulon, who runs a network of 14 backyard vegetable farms in Vancouver, he hopes to learn to tell the difference between a seed and a weed. This is his second report.

Even this early in the growing season, some crops are ready to harvest. Spinach, radishes, a few varieties of lettuce, several kinds of salad greens and herbs are all ready to eat. That’s because these crops can tolerate a cool soil temperature; others can’t. It’s also why if you visit a farmers’ market now, you won’t find much else unless it’s been grown in a greenhouse.

read more @ the SOURCE: Vancouver Sun – Urban Farmer II.

AILA announce list of submissions for 2008 National Awards

AILA (Australian Institute of Landscape Architects) has listed the submissions received for the 2008 Award categories.

Design in Landscape Architecture has had 47 entries with a wide range of projects including Wetlands, Skateparks, Beijing Olympic Villages, Universities to Landscape art.

Landscape Management has fewer entries relating to management plans and eco resorts

Planning in Landscape Architecture a category focused on masterplanning of variety of scale projects.

Research and Communication in Landscape Architecture the list of entries varies from IT virtual reality and internet to books and education programs

Future Leaders category is to recognise those with new leadership qualities through their professional educational or community based endeavors.  

Award winners will be announced in late August/early September

SOURCE: AILA(Australia Institute of Landscape Architects)

Vertical farms and future cities

What do vertical farms, green roofs, soft cars, breathing walls, and Dongtan, China, have in common? They were all subjects of discussion at Friday’s Future Cities event in New York City, part of the four-day 2008 World Science Festival.

To a packed house, Columbia University microbiologist Dickson Despommier described his vision for feeding the planet’s burgeoning, and increasingly urban, population. The vertical farm takes agriculture and stacks it into the tiers of a modern skyscraper. Instead of stopping at the corner pizzeria for dinner, Despommier suggested, you could pluck a nice head of lettuce, maybe some corn, and some tomatoes for a big salad, all in your own building, on the way to your apartment. You can’t get fresher or more local than that.

SOURCE: Gristmill – Vertical farms and future cities | Gristmill: The environmental news blog .

1 ... 615 616 617 618 619 620 621 622 623 624 625 ... 745