This Week in Landscape | 2 February 2013

Another week in landscape architecture with our selection of links from around the world

Landscape Urbanism…Decoded? | OLIN
“What is landscape urbanism? Is it a method, a practice, or a result? What does this term mean to contemporary practitioners of landscape architecture?”

Landscape Architects: Please Don’t Call Us ‘Architects’ | Sommer Mathis | Atlantic Cities
ASLA goes after Atlantic Cities for spelling Olmsted wrong and calling him an architect. Also stating there is “distinction between landscape architecture and architecture…”

Detroit Mayor Announces Parks and Recreation Closures and Cuts Due to City Council’s Belle Isle Decision | City of Detroit
Detroit Mayor Dave Bing announced that 50 Detroit parks will close this spring and the operation of other City parks and recreation centers will be severely impacted, due to the Detroit City Council’s failure to approve a Belle Isle lease agreement with the State of Michigan.

Iowa State landscape architecture professor receives national planning award | Iowa State University
The American Planning Association is honoring an Iowa State University faculty member with a national award. Christopher J. Seeger, an associate professor of landscape architecture and extension specialist, will receive a 2013 National Planning Achievement Award for Transportation Planning.

Imagining in the Urban Wild | Stephen Plunkard | Stantec is…..
Could an interesting, creative and challenging outdoor experience be an alternative to video games? Would it encourage girls and boys to become planners, designers and engineers?

Global Centre for Ecosystem Management Established by UNEP and China | UNEP
The UN Environment Programme (UNEP) and the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have established a new global centre on ecosystem management in Beijing, which is aimed at promoting ecosystem management in developing countries.

Soils management will be key to food, water and climate security | UNEP

Image Credit: Flickr User Soil Science

UNEP has just released the United Nations Environment Programme’s (UNEP) Year Book 2012  and it highlights assessments indicating that some kinds of conventional and intensive agriculture are triggering soil erosion rates some 100 times greater than the rates at which nature can form soil in the first place.

There could also be profound implications for climate change. Soils contain huge quantities of carbon in the form of organic matter that in turn binds the nutrients needed for plant growth and allows rainfall to penetrate into underground aquifers. By 2030, without changes in the way land is managed, over 20 per cent of terrestrial habitats such as forests, peatlands and grasslands in developing countries alone could be converted to cropland aggravating losses of vital ecosystem services and biodiversity.

Continue reading Soils management will be key to food, water and climate security | UNEP