This Week in Landscape | 19 January 2014

ice_storm_cleanup
After ice storm exacts unprecedented damage to Toronto’s urban forest, question remains on what to do with the broken trees | Peter Kuitenbrouwer | National Post
“Never in Toronto’s history has a storm exacted such a toll on our forest. Still, does it make sense to grind all these trees up for mulch? Many in the city’s forestry sector, which employs 25,000 people, are pleading for a more creative approach to reusing one of Canada’s most famous and historic resources: our trees.”

How Weʼve Abandoned Dan Kiley | Tom Bamberger | urban milwaukee
“Why isn’t the grass of a master landscape designer given the same care as an above average suburban lawn? Plunking the Lake Festival of Arts on top of the Kiley every June has something to do with it. In September tents were set up for some other festival.”

World’s smallest water lily stolen from Kew Gardens | Guardian
“A Nymphaea thermarum, the smallest water lily in the world and extinct in the wild, is believed to have been stolen between 8.30am and 2.55pm last Thursday at the Princess of Wales Conservatory ”

Could prison gardening schemes be the key to rehabilitation? | Emma Inglis | The Telegraph
“The gardens at Dartmoor prison are the exemplar of a successful horticultural rehabilitation project. In 2006, prison officer Ivan Judd had an idea to transform the disused exercise yards of the old punishment unit into vegetable gardens to be tended by inmates in the resettlement wing.”

Blogging Praxis/Practice | Praxis in Landscape Architecture
“This winter and spring, I will be posting a series on two projects I’m working on – a public health/neighborhood environment survey that I am very excited about and a studio class that I am teaching.”

Continue reading This Week in Landscape | 19 January 2014

This Week In Landscape | 3 March 2013

This Week In Landscape | 3 March 2013

Vancouver | Coal Harbour | Flickr User alans1948

Landscape links from around the world during the week of 25 February to 3 March 2013

Landscape Performance Research: The Economics of Change | Jason Twill, LEED AP and Stuart Cowan, PhD | Landscape Architecture Foundation
The overarching goal of The Economics of Change is to shift mainstream real estate practices to document the full value of a built environment that is compatible with healthy, natural systems.

The Most Important Urban Design Decision Vancouver Ever Made? | Brent Toderian | Huffington Post
“In 1997, the city approved its first transformative Transportation Plan. Co-written through a first-time (and not easy) partnership between city planners and transportation engineers, the plan was a game-changer for our city-making model in many ways….”

The Green Team Part 10: POPS for the People…and the Developer | Zeina Zahalan | Metropolis Magazine
“The primary goal of POPS is to unite function with aesthetics—to create public spaces that provide respite in the city’s dense urban fabric.”

Urbanization of the People Must Follow That of the Land | Lan Fang | Caixin
The core of urbanization lies not only in large-scale city building and expansion of industrial parks, but also in the great migration of people from farm villages into cities.

Pedestrian Friendly Streetscape in Santa Cruz | William Langston | A Landscape Architect and a Passport
“So when we were in Puerto Ayora, Santa Cruz Island I was immediately taken by the impressive streetscape improvements to the main streets in town.”

Sequestration Frustration, Close to Home | OLIN Blog
“Clearly the politics of this question run deep, and as advocates of the urban public realm, we can’t hope to remain unbiased. But maybe if we, as advocates and citizens, can join the conversation, we can encourage the power players in Washington to start talking as well.”

A Blog’s Adieu | New York Times
Sadly, the New York Times Green blog has been shutdown to focus on other areas.

IMAGE CREDIT | Flickr User alans1948

READING THE LANDSCAPE: On-Line Reading Group Seeking Members

READING THE LANDSCAPE is an on-line reading group dedicated to fostering engaging dialogue about the shaping of our built environment. The inaugural group will begin reading The Landscape Urbanism Reader edited by Charles Waldheim the week of February 21st. The group will include a total of 15 people. Depending on the material selected, the format for the reading group will involve reading a chapter, essay, or article each week with asynchronous on-line discussion regarding it during the following week. The format is intended to make it easier for busy professionals to participate. After each week, one person will summarize the discussion as a blog post for public discussion.

Due to the limited size of the group and the desire to ensure dynamic and multiple perspectives through the inclusion of professionals of diverse backgrounds, the organizers are requesting Letters of Interest from those who would want to participate.

READING THE LANDSCAPE is a collaboration between Damian Holmes founder of the webzine World Landscape Architecture and this website – Land Reader; Jason King, editor of Vegitecture and Landscape + Urbanism, and Brian Phelps, co-founder of sitephocus.com. All are also avid practicing professionals in landscape architecture and urban design.

For more information email me – Damian Holmes or Jason King or Brian Phelps
LETTERS OF INTEREST for READING THE LANDSCAPE is now CLOSED
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