This Week In Landscape | 23 June 2013

On Sunday, the 16th June in the Heidelberg Friedrich-Ebert-Platz over 2,500 homemade napkins trees were planted in the plaza for Plant Trees Not Wars - a crowdfunded initiative to plant vegetables on Heidelberg green spaces that can be harvested.

On Sunday, the 16th June in the Heidelberg Friedrich-Ebert-Platz over 2,500 homemade napkins trees were planted in the plaza for Plant Trees Not Wars – a crowdfunded initiative to plant vegetables on Heidelberg green spaces that can be harvested.

Studio Report: Flux City | Chris Reed | Urban Omnibus 
“The studio site was Jamaica Bay, an ecologically rich habitat containing many marshy islands, surrounded by highly developed residential and industrial areas including JFK airport, Floyd Bennett Field, and neighborhoods like Marine Park.”

Designed for Democracy: When Public Goes Private a Park Loses Its Heart | Charles A. Birnbaum | Huffington Post
“Nationally, in the wake of urban growth and renewal, there is considerable debate about whether public parks and open space should be given away or sold to for-profit enterprises.”

From Cargo to Kayaks: New York City’s Piers Then and Now | Hana R. Alberts | Curbed NY
“Today, what’s left ranges from decayed remnants of stumpy pilings to completely renovated complexes—think Chelsea Piers”

Low-allergy Landscapes | Johanna Phelps | Metropolis Magazine
What can we do as landscape designers to help alleviate this escalation in allergies? Ask our campus clients, developers, and other large-scale landowners.

“Techno-utopias are wrapped up in their own visions of nature” | Sam Jacob | Dezeen
“Sam Jacob looks at how Google Maps is reshaping cities while Apple, Facebook and Amazon are reshaping the natural landscape by building their own headquarters as self-contained ecosystems.”

‘Garden district’ plan on Edinburgh greenbelt | Kate Pickles |
A MASTERPLAN has been launched to show how greenbelt land owned by Sir David Murray would be transformed into a £1 billion “garden district”.

ASLA commends reintroduction of Community Parks Revitalization Act
“The American Society of Landscape Architects commends Congressman Albio Sires (NJ) for reintroducing today the Community Parks Revitalization Act (CPRA), which would help communities to rehabilitate existing and develop new community parks and outdoor recreational facilities.”

IMAGE CREDIT | Flickr User HDValentin

MORE INFORMATION | Plant Trees Not Wars (German)


This Week in Landscape | 2 June 2013

Another week of great landscape content on the web. Here are our picks of the week…

Urbanism and the Landscape Architect | Mark Hough | Planetizen
“Landscape architects are not given nearly enough recognition for being urbanists.”

How Big Is That Park? City Now Has the Answer | Lisa W. Foderaro | NY Times
“Over the last three years, the New York City Department of Parks and Recreation has been remeasuring every park in the system”

Edible Bus Stop opens as part of Chelsea Fringe | Landscape Institute
“The newly opened Edible Bus Stop on Lambeth’s Landor Road, is the first of the capital’s ‘pocket parks’ to be completed with matched funding from the Mayor’s Pocket Park Programme.”

City Shaping VI: In 21st Century Toronto, There is Momentum | Charles A. Birnbaum | Huffington Post
“As part of this transformation, what’s particularly noteworthy is Toronto’s use of landscape architecture as a development catalyst, especially along the city’s waterfront.”

The City and the Sea | Tom Vanderbilt | PLACES
“And as Hurricane Sandy showed, the sea will not be forgotten. At a parking lot under the FDR Drive, where a few months earlier I had queued for locally sourced tacos at the New Amsterdam Market, Craft told me the water would have been over our heads.”

Landscape Architect Finds Her Creativity Working In A Small Space | Bill Motchan | The Chicago Architecture Blog
“I love working with clients and learning their vision so I get to execute their vision,” she said.”

Renderings Revealed for Main Street at Brooklyn Bridge Park | Jessica Dailey | Curbed NY
Brooklyn Bridge Park’s plans for expansion of its Main Street section were unveiled at a recent community board meeting.

Designing cities for better health: If you build it, they will walk | Dave McGinn | The Globe and Mail
“Many Canadian cities have also officially adopted the new urban planning thinking, especially Toronto, where the public health department released a report in 2011 on how communities shape the health of residents….”

This Week In Landscape | 17 February 2013

Cummins Inc | Columbus Indiana | Design by Dan Kiley | Image Credit | berriehol

Landscape links from around the world in the week that was
Dan Kiley: A great yet little known Modernist | Charles A. Birnbaum | Huffington Post
“Kiley was also among the most important, influential and personally idiosyncratic landscape architects of the 20th century and designer of more than 1,100 projects – yet today he is not well known.”

Now Atlanta Is Turning Old Tracks Green | Robby Brown | NY Times
“The BeltLine would be the most expensive rails-to-trails project, urban planners say. It would add 40 percent more parks to Atlanta. Only 4.6 percent of Atlanta is parkland….”

The World’s Largest Firms Have Been Ranked… But Does It Matter? | Vanessa Quirk | ArchDaily
“This Top 5 gives us a sense of the major players in the architectural world, but with the subjective ranking of their efficiency”

How to Make Suburbs Work Like Cities |  Trisha Riggs | Urban Land
The steady movement toward more compact suburban growth is being driven in part by generation Y, an 80 million–member demographic group that is entering the markets for housing and jobs.

Urban sprawl affects inner-ring suburbs, too | Don Jacobson | Star Tribune
“….residents of closer-in areas also say they “feel” those characteristics of sprawl in their neighborhoods despite their higher population densities, and a University of Minnesota researcher says a study she performed indicates their perception in many cases is indeed more than just a feeling.”

IMAGE CREDIT | Flickr user | berrihol | Holly Higgins

This Week in Landscape | 23 December 2012

Fresh Kills Park | Image Credit gsz

Fresh Kills Park | Image Credit gsz

This week of landscape links as we head toward 2013

Staten Island Landfill Park Proves Savior in Hurricane | Michael Kimmelman | NY Times
During Hurricane Sandy, the Fresh Kills landfill on Staten Island absorbed a critical part of the storm surge.

Urban renewal for the planet | Adrian Higgins | Washington Post
From a wasteland of empty lots and rundown buildings has sprung whole blocks of plush apartments, hotel suites, offices and bistros.

Living with Sandy: New York and Our Very Real Climate Change Future | Urban Omnibus
Superstorm Sandy and its continuing messy aftermath have provoked many serious conversations about New York City’s future. These range from private concerns about flood insurance and temporary housing to more public anxieties about the city as a coastal metropolis.

2012’s Notable Developments in Landscape Architecture | Charles A. Birnbaum | Huffington Post
With that said, here’s my list of 2012’s notable developments in landscape architecture

Metro Vancouver tree damage worst since 2006 storm | CBC
A week of heavy rain, snow, and wind have wreaked havoc across the Vancouver and at least 200 trees have fallen in Pacific Spirit Park, which separates Vancouver’s western edge from the UBC campus.

New Website Puts Spotlight on Blue Carbon | UNEP
Marine ecosystems, such as mangrove forests, seagrass meadows and saltwater marshes, can capture and store a significant amount of atmospheric carbon.

A Biodiversity Map, Version 2.0 | Rachel Nuwer | NY Times
“We’re not inventing anything here, we’re just implementing Wallace’s vision at an age where we have tons of DNA and more information on where species are on the planet.”

IMAGE CREDIT | Flickr user gsz (Garrett Ziegler)

VIDEOS | Bridging the Nature-Culture Divide II Conference Proceedings

The Cultural Landscape Foundation has published the video proceedings of their recent conference Bridging the Nature-Culture Divide II. The conference co-sponsored with the Central Park Conservancy examined the critical design and maintenance issues faced at some of the nation’s premiere urban woodlands. Landscape Architecture academics and professionals presented material  Stewardship of Central Park’s Woodlands.

Presenters and Panellists include Christopher Nolan, Charles A. Birnbaum, FASLA, Eric W. Sanderson, Michael Boland, Todd Forrest, Christian Zimmerman, Elizabeth K. Meyer, Keith Bowers, Dennis C. McGlade, and Margie Ruddick. You can watch the full series on youtube

VIDEO CREDIT | The Cultural Landscape Foundation

This Week in Landscape | 4 November

This Week in Landscape 4 November

Fallen lindens at the Great Lawn in Central Park | Image Courtesy Central Park Conservancy

This weeks landscape links from across the world

A New Philanthropic Threshold — The Significance of Central Park’s Gift | Charles A. Birnbaum | Huffington Post

Philanthropy and public-private partnerships should not be faulted but encouraged, especially following Hurricane Sandy’s damage to the parks when it’s most needed.

Over 250 trees damaged in Central Park by Hurricane Sandy | Central Park Conservancy
Hurricane Sandy destroyed more than 250 mature trees in Central Park as well as infrastructure, including fencing and benches, throughout the Park’s 843 acres.

A post-hurricane argument about New York’s waterfront infrastructure | Dana Rubenstein | Capital New York
One of several strategies the RPA suggested exploring is tidal barriers, of the sort used in London and Rotterdam.

How to make a landscape edible look incredible | Mary James | UT San Diego
….integrate edibles within an ornamental “backbone.” This way there will always be something to look at, even when edibles have been harvested.

Iskandar – Asia’s newest megacity or a cookie cutter template for cities? | Damian Holmes | LAND Reader
There seems to be this constant rush for ‘experts’ and urban planners to create a ‘template’ for the green, low carbon, sustainable, (insert latest buzz word) city, and ignoring the reason many cities attract people.

 How cyclists and pedestrians can share space on canal towpaths | Laura Laker | Guardian
You are welcome to cycle here but you have got to do it with respect for others. That is what all cyclists need to hear loud and clear.”

Hurricane Sandy on Bikes in NYC from Casey Neistat on Vimeo.

This Week In Landscape | 16 September 2012

Another week of landscape links from around the world
The Big Task of Managing Nature at New York’s Central Park | Charles A. Birnbaum | The Cultural Landscape Foundation
“Central Park faces unprecedented use, along with changing climatic conditions and an onslaught of severe weather events. Additionally, increasing knowledge and proven notions about ecological restoration have added a new dimension to this century-and-a-half long conversation about how we interact with our environment and manage our idealized version of nature.”

Green walls ‘need building code’ to reduce fire hazard
“A SYDNEY landscape architect is pushing for green walls to be regulated under building and fire safety codes after he recently saw one go up in flames at a local bar.”

Urban Forestry for Symbolizing Eco-City | Md. Zahidur Rahman and Saeed Ahmed Siddiquee | Blitz
“Currently, unplanned urbanization resulted ecological imbalances in the city. FAO (2008) pointed out that Dhaka city has 21.57% open space where city parks belong to 0.89% and 0.02% for urban forest, garden for 0.90% and 12.12% for agriculture to meets the ecological balance of the city dwellers.”

African Ministers Adopt Programmes to Boost Sustainable Development, Eye Key Role in Post-Rio+20 Landscape | UNEP

What architects do doesn’t count | Jody Brown | Coffee with an Architect
“Because we don’t design the destination. We design the path.”

Fire-Resistant Plant List for the California Supplemental Exam | CSE for Landscape Architects
“These plants will eventually burn if the fire conditions are hot and dry enough, but they resist ignition better than many other species.”

Exploring the Upper West Side’s Riverside Park South | Curbed NY
“Riverside Park South offers up one of the Manhattan’s best opportunities to consider the city’s past as an industrial hub while considering the future of its waterfront. ”

IMAGE CREDIT: Flickr User Ed Yourdon

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