Student Project | Here-East Wet-lands Rehabilitation | Farinoosh Hadian Jazy

Here-East Wet-lands Rehabilitation won the 2022 WLA Student Awards – Award of Excellence in the Concept-Design category

Here-East

Roads, highways, and buildings are the main features of modern cities. Along with those hard layers of landscape, there is leftover terrain with scarce vegetation. Many of these forgotten lands constitute “terrain vague” (De Sola Morales). These hard layers of our cities have many impacts on our environment. One of the most significant is the rapid increase in the level of runoff as the ground is not able to absorb water. This problem causes a high risk of floods in various parts of the world.

Here-East

Here-East Wet-lands Rehabilitation suggests a possible way to absorb runoff by designing a wetland out of terrain vague and improving the ecosystem of the site. At Here East, Hackney Wick, London, there is a linear site with poor vegetation near the River Lee Navigation Channel. The proposal suggests the creation of a linear wetland with defined pathways and flexible wooden scaffoldings. These provide endless moments and opportunities for visitors to engage with the site and define its use.

In the proposal I considered three elements for the site to introduce a new identity to the terrain:

Water

The wetland gathers stormwater and visitors experience different moments at various times depending on the weather: A reflected landscape (when the ponds are full) and meadows (when water is evaporated). Ponds and lakes in the wetland can introduce new species to the site.

Here-East

Pathways

A natural foundation from leftover stumps is the main structure of the pathways. These foundations detached the pathways from ground to let the wetland work without any disruptions caused by visitors. Therefore, plants such as Mugwort can grow easily to attract new eco-system.

Here-East
Here-East

Plants

Plants are one of important factors in attracting new eco-systems. Plants like Common Mugwort, Buckthorn, and trees such as Ash tree can attract insects and animals with their flowers, fruits, and seeds. Therefore, more and more species will come to the site.

Here-East

Here-East Wet-lands Rehabilitation

Student Name: Farinoosh Hadian Jazy
School: Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL
Advisors: Cannon Ivers and Alexandru Malaescu

blank
About Damian Holmes 5485 Articles
Damian Holmes is the Founder and Editor of World Landscape Architecture (WLA). He is a registered landscape architect (AILA) working in international design practice in Australia. Damian founded WLA in 2007 to provide a website for landscape architects written by landscape architects. Connect on Linkedin at https://www.linkedin.com/in/damianholmes/