This Week In Landscape | 13 October 2013

Weekly landscape news links and interesting reading

University spending up, government down: World’s landscape architect of the year | BRW
“The Australian winner of the world’s highest award for landscape architecture says more work from institutions like universities is offsetting a decline in government work….”

China’s urban landscapes take on new meaning for New York architect | Xu Donghuan | SCMP
New York architect Jeffrey Johnson first visited China in the spring of 2006 with a group of students he was teaching at the graduate school of architecture, planning and preservation (GSAPP) at Columbia University.

Students rallying to save CCA courtyard | Amanda Grover | Utah Statesman
“Sam Taylor, a junior studying landscape architecture, has taken a particular interest in the project. He sees the courtyard as one of the most beautiful and valuable places on campus and important due to its use and the legacy it holds. The space was designed by a 1967 USU graduate, Garr Campbell, who later received his master’s degree from Harvard.”

Better Solutions for Auckland’s Berms | Joe Dawson | Auckland Now
“Debate over the berms has provided an opportunity to think about alternative ways to construct streetscapes, New Zealand Institute of Landscape Architects member Sally Peake says.”

Master of Landscape Architecture program receives accreditation | Washington University in St.Louis
“The Master of Landscape Architecture (MLA) program in the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts has received a full, six-year term of accreditation from the Landscape Architectural Accreditation Board (LAAB).”

Ghost Tree Installed Above Lady Bird Lake | Alicia Dietrich | Alcalde
The art installation is meant to raise awareness about the ongoing drought across Texas, and it is the culmination of a yearlong collaboration by several Longhorn members and Women & Their Work, a visual and performing art organization in Austin

How Would NYC’s Great Urban Planners Design For The Future? | Jessica Dailey | Curbed NY
“Alex Washburn, New York City’s Chief of Urban Design, lives in Red Hook. When Hurricane Sandy hit, he watched the flood waters stream into stream into his brick townhouse, and since then, he, along with his neighbors, has been trying to figure out how to rebuild.”

A Gorgeous Map Of San Francisco, Stripped Of All The Urbanism | Mark Wilson | Fast Co. Design
The piece was inspired by a combination of San Francisco’s unique landscape and the general failings of traditional topographical maps, which are, on one hand, a triumph of data visualization, and on the other, very difficult for the average person to decipher.

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