This Week in Landscape | 15 April 2012

This weeks round-up of landscape news from around the web.

Why Designers Need To Stop Feeling Sorry For Africa | Skibsted Ideation | Fast Co Design
Taking a patronizing approach to investing in Africa undermines the continent’s people and entrepreneurial promise, argues Jens Martin Skibsted and Rasmus Bech Hansen.

How green is a parking lot? New efforts to test infrastructure | David J. Unger | Sacremento Bee
A growing number of civil engineers, landscape architects and urban planners are making a case for not just repairing but also for greening the structural underbelly we rely on to drink our water, cross our rivers and park our cars.

NY state parks system getting $89M funding boost | Wall Street Journal
$89 million in New York Works capital projects for the state-run system of 178 parks and 35 historic sites.

Six new spots for architecture lovers | Katia Hetter | CNN
Various spots around the world including the High Line

A new approach to infrastructure | Denise Deveau | Calgary Herald

Canadian cities need to replace their aging infrastructure to accommodate new weather patterns, shifting demographics and social trends

The Shell Game | Martin C. Pedersen | Metropolis Magazine
New York University announced yesterday that it was scaling back its controversial plans for expansion

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This Week in Landscape | 8 April 2012

This weeks round-up of landscape news from around the web

Five Paradigm Shifts to Enhance a City | Various Contributors | The Tyee
Various panels paradigm from ‘Shift’ – UBC School of Landscape and Architecture’s fall lecture series

Does Poor Urban Planning Contribute to Crime in Gurgaon? | Raka Choudhury | India Realtime-WSJ
In Gurgaon, despite the excitement and energy of economic boom-time, the quality of life of urban residents is constantly challenged by poor planning.

Lily Jencks on Landscape Design | Susanna Sirefman| Wall Street Journal 
The rising young star of landscape design on low-fuss plants, Chinese gardens and her mother’s extraordinary legacy

A path to gardens’ renewal | TBO.COM
More talk of repairing Kiley Gardens in Tampa Bay (designed by Dan Kiley)

Controversy brewing over Counterbalance Park | Queen Anne View
Finished park (designed by Murase Associates) about to be ruined by committee – what all landscape architects dread

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WSJ joins the LU vs NU debate with The Rise of the “Landscape Urbanists”

Christopher Shea recently posted The Rise of the “Landscape Urbanists” on his Wall Street Journal blog

And that’s the rub—the bit about cars and “spacious suburbs.” Architects who believe that a fresh commitment to urban living offers the best path to a sustainable future are deeply disconcerted by this quasi-green rhetoric, and by the way it’s catching on at trendy architecture schools. They call it a “a misguided surrender to suburban sprawl.”

Read more at WSJ

Adriaan Geuze: ‘Parks are like poetry and music’

Adriaan Geuze, founding partner of WEST 8 was recently interviewed in 60 seconds by Wall Street Journal. Adriaan talks about European and American landscapes and gives some interesting insights into his personal life and landscape architecture. The insight I like most in the interview is

Parks are like poetry and music. They basically have no reason to exist—that is also what is so special about them. They are places where you can dream about a non-realistic, non-time-related world.

Read more at the Wall Street Journal – On the Cutting Hedge: Design firm West 8 brings a modern sensibility to urban landscapes.

Alsop: Landscape architects see themselves as social engineers

Recently in an Will Alsop commented in interview with the Wall Street Journal

“…Current notions about public space have been institutionalized, often by landscape architects, who in my experience often don’t know the names of trees, but see themselves as social engineers. Horrible concept.”

Seems that he hasn’t change his views since the Alsop vs Schwartz debate in 2008.

Read the full interview by Andrew McKie at Wall Street Journal – Building a Brighter Future

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