This Week in Landscape | 2 February 2014

Interesting landscape reading from across the web with some thought provoking material before you start your working week.

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High Lines and park life: why more green isn’t always greener for cities | Owen Hatherley | Guardian
“Transforming old industrial areas into urban woodland may look nice but can be conterproductive[sic] in the long run” – Interesting read, but still wondering how the Highline is conterproductive[sic] in the long run.

‘Open spaces needed for meetings’ | Riyan Ramanath V, | Times of India
“Lack of such open areas inside the city is forcing communities, political, religious and social groups to use smaller spaces, which is resulting in traffic congestion on the roads.”

See How NYC Streets Got More Pedestrian-Friendly In 25 Years | Curbed NY | Zoe Rosenberg
Great images of before and after the implementation of pedestrian/bike friendly road design

How town planning can make us thin and healthy: Architects show that more green space and less housing density has a clear effect on public health | Charlie Cooper | Independent
“With responsibility for public healthcare devolved now from central Government to local authorities, it’s vital that planners and developers take the lead in ensuring healthier cities,” said. RIBA’s president, Stephen Hodder.

Continue reading This Week in Landscape | 2 February 2014

This Week In Landscape | 6 January 2013

The first “This Week In Landscape” for 2013 with weekly links from around the world

Virginia Tech: Light pollution from virginiatech on Vimeo. Short Video (1min 48s).

Exploring Philadelphia’s New “Penn Park” | Sarah Kathleen Peck | landscape urbanism
“A few weeks ago, I had the chance to stop by Philadelphia and the University of Pennsvylania’s new Penn Park, a 23-acre waterfront park woven in between more than five different infrastructural systems and multiple-level land locks.”

Will Biomimicry Offer a Way Forward, Post-Sandy? | Sarah Amandolare | NY Times
“Kapok trees, honeycombs and mangroves are just a few of the naturally occurring features or processes that have informed the designs of buildings from Haiti to South Korea to New York City in recent years.”

ADAPTATION – How can cities be “climate-proofed”? | Eric Klinenberg | New Yorker
PLANNING about “climate-proofing.” For the past decade and a half, governments around the world have been investing in elaborate plans to “climate-proof” their cities

For America’s Cities, The Future can be found in the past | Manuel Cadrecha | ideas+buildings (Perkins Will)
“The city belongs to me long after I left and moved away, and it exists as my home, alive in my imagination.”

Have We Lost the Peace of Park Spaces? | Stephen Plunkard | Stantec is…
“My sense is that, today, we are rarely incorporating quiet spaces into our rural and urban parks. We often program active areas for tots, adolescents, teenagers and now adult/senior playgrounds, but we rarely seem to plan for quiet and contemplative spaces in public, secular venues.”

The Case for Walkability as an Economic Development Tool | Kaid Benfield | Atlantic Cities
“A terrific street redesign is assisting economic development in a southern California community that has suffered from changing economic conditions but is nevertheless seeing significant population growth…”

Top 12 Blogs from Landscape, Architecture and Planning Firms | Walter Communication
A few blogs of landscape architecture and architecture planning firms.

Convida Suape Master plan | Cabo de Santo Agostinho Brazil | Broadway Malyan

Convida Suape Master plan

The master plan vision for Convida Suape, a new city in North Eastern Brazil, designed by global architecture, urbanism and design practice Broadway Malyan. Convida Suape is a sustainable urban extension of the city of Cabo de Santo Agostinho near Recife, the capital city of the State of Pernambuco, and will result in the transformation of a 470 hectare area to accommodate up to 100,000 inhabitants.

Continue reading Convida Suape Master plan | Cabo de Santo Agostinho Brazil | Broadway Malyan

Urbanism – trying to balance wants & needs

Kaid Benfield in his recent post for Switchboard asks “How much Urbanism is enough?”. What is the right balance of walkability and nature? What is your a person who need to retreat from the urban environment? How do we balance transit with driving cars solo?  Kaid looks at various challenges we face in creating cities which create a walkable, green city.

Read more at [Switchboard]

Researchers discover links between city walkability and air pollution exposure

Researchers discover links between city walkability and air pollution exposure : UMNews : University of Minnesota

A new study compares neighborhoods’ walkability (degree of ease for walking) with local levels of air pollution and finds that some neighborhoods might be good for walking, but have poor air quality. Researchers involved in the study include University of Minnesota faculty member Julian Marshall and University of British Columbia faculty Michael Brauer and Lawrence Frank.

The findings highlight the need for urban design to consider both walkability and air pollution, recognizing that neighborhoods with high levels of one pollutant may have low levels of another pollutant.

The study, done for the city of Vancouver, British Columbia, is the first of its kind to compare the two environmental attributes, and suggests potential environmental health effects of neighborhood location, layout and design for cities around the globe.

The research study is published in the November 2009 issue of Environmental Health Perspectives, the peer-reviewed journal of the United States’ National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

[SOURCE: UMNews (University of Minnesota)]

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