Canada’s biggest green roof was technically challenging: LA

Journal of Commerce reports

The biggest living roof in Canada is surrounded by water on three sides, and the marine deck on which the building sits is supported by stilt-like piles. It also features slopes of up to 53 per cent.

Bruce Hemstock, of PWL Partnership, a Vancouver landscape architecture and consulting firm that worked on the project, said the roof portion of the job was one of the most technically challenging assignments his firm has taken on in its 35 years in the business.

Read the full article at the SOURCE: Journal of CommerceCreating Vancouver Convention Centre’s green roof no simple task

UBC students design pavilion for 2010 Olympics

Sarah Chung at the THEUBYSSEY.CA reports

The 24-hour design session, or 24-hour charette, consisted of interdisciplinary architecture student teams designing a rain-proof, bright, and lively pavilion to be erected in Downtown Vancouver for the 2010 Olympics. The event was held at the Lasserre Building and ended at 9am Monday morning.

“[The Olympics] are starting to get so close…this is a chance to have an effect and be involved in the Olympics, and the fact that [the pavilion] will actually be built, that’s really exciting,” said Jamie Johnson, a second-year Landscape Architecture student.

Winners will be announced on November 16 by a panel of multi-disciplinary judges.

read more of the article at the SOURCE: THEUBYSSEY.CA

Researchers discover links between city walkability and air pollution exposure

Researchers discover links between city walkability and air pollution exposure : UMNews : University of Minnesota

A new study compares neighborhoods’ walkability (degree of ease for walking) with local levels of air pollution and finds that some neighborhoods might be good for walking, but have poor air quality. Researchers involved in the study include University of Minnesota faculty member Julian Marshall and University of British Columbia faculty Michael Brauer and Lawrence Frank.

The findings highlight the need for urban design to consider both walkability and air pollution, recognizing that neighborhoods with high levels of one pollutant may have low levels of another pollutant.

The study, done for the city of Vancouver, British Columbia, is the first of its kind to compare the two environmental attributes, and suggests potential environmental health effects of neighborhood location, layout and design for cities around the globe.

The research study is published in the November 2009 issue of Environmental Health Perspectives, the peer-reviewed journal of the United States’ National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, part of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

[SOURCE: UMNews (University of Minnesota)]

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