Link urban and rural India

Prakash Joshi of the The Times of India reports in Link urban and rural India, says Rahul

“There is one India living in the urban areas, which is completely different from the one in rural India. We have to connect the two so
that the latter also enjoys the fruits of India’s growth,” said AICC general secretary Rahul Gandhi at a rally in Panvel on Thursday.

The venue was apt, as Panvel has a mix of both urban and rural India. Within a few kilometres from the main town is rural Panvel, which has witnessed a lot of protests recently. Some have been over land acquisitions for Cidco, the proposed Navi Mumbai SEZ and Mahamumbai SEZ.

read more from the SOURCE: The Times of India – Link urban and rural India, says Rahul – Mumbai

Urban rail is a new engine for development – The Globe and Mail

The Globe and Mail reports

“With the Canada Line coming, it was not business as usual. We knew that,” says Terry Crowe, the manager of policy planning in the suburb of Richmond south of Vancouver, which launched an aggressive initiative five years ago to redesign its city around the five transit stations in preparation for new development.

Read the full article @ the SOURCE: The Globe and Mail – Urban rail is a new engine for development

Increased Density could mean reduced emissions

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Last week the NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL released a report titled DRIVING AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT: THE EFFECTS OF COMPACT DEVELOPMENT ON MOTORIZED TRAVEL, ENERGY USE, AND CO2 EMISSIONS stating that

Increasing population and employment density in metropolitan areas could reduce vehicle travel, energy use, and CO2 emissions from less than 1 percent up to 11 percent by 2050 compared to a base case for household vehicle usage……

The report continues to give examples of if 75% of all new and replacement housing units were developed at twice the density and people drive 25% less then then CO2 emissions would be reduced by 7-8% by 2030, 8-11% by 2050. However if only 25% of housing was developed at twice the density and drove 12% less then the reduction in CO2 would only be 1% by 2030 and 1.7% by 2050.

The report also outlined the obstacles with trying achieve 75% dwellings at twice the denisty including local growth, local zoning regulations, concerns about congestion and home values.

The report also stated that

Government policies to support more compact, mixed-use development should be encouraged, the report says. The nation is likely to set ambitious goals to address climate change and, given the large contribution of the transportation sector to greenhouse gas emissions, changes in land use may have to be part of the effort.  If so, land use changes should be implemented soon, because current development patterns will take decades to reverse

For more information about the report go to the NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL website.

SOURCE: NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL

IMAGE SOURCE: Flickr austrini (suburbia)  Flickr DrPleishner (city)

India looking to the past and future urban planning to solve monsoon problems

Over the last few days there have been a few articles and news reports about the state of urban planning in India. The catalyst for this buzz is the monsoon rains that hit India over the last week. We have collated the articles in to one summary post for our readers. – Damian Holmes

NDMA blames 50 years of bad planning for Delhi deluge

As the national capital continues to cope with the after-effects of heavy showers with some places still waterlogged, the National Disaster Management Authority (NDMA) says five decades of bad planning was responsible for Delhi coming to a virtual standstill on that rained out Monday three days ago.

SOURCE: sifynews.com – NDMA blames 50 years of bad planning for Delhi deluge

Listen to two planning experts give their view on the issue at livemint.com

Just to Clarify welcomes two guests. Professor Usha Raghupathi, from the National Institute of Urban Affairs, has a domain of expertise that includes urban development management, infrastructure and services, and urban reforms. A Srivatsan is a Chennai-based urban planning expert.

SOURCE: Livemint & WSJ – Why do the rains wreck Indian cities?

City squares miss urban life: expert – China Daily

Tan Yingzi of China Daily reports

While more and more Chinese cities are following Dalian’s example and building large city squares, urban planning experts warned Thursday that local governments must stop simply copying the Western style and look for more practical construction and local flavor.

read the full article at the SOURCE: China Daily – City squares miss urban life: expert

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