This Week In Landscape | 14 July 2013

Its northern summer and there seems to plenty of landscape writing for your weekly reading. This Week in Landscape will add some links from non-english sources for our readers.

Peter Latz awarded the Topos Landscape Award. Latz + Partners were the winners of the St Peter’s Square international design competition have been announced by Manchester City Council in May 2012.

Topos Landscape Award 2013 goes to Peter Latz | Peter Zöch | Topos
German landscape architect Peter Latz has been awarded the Topos Landscape Award 2013.

PLAY GROUNDS — Global | Monocle
The role of parks and other green urban spaces as quality-of-life improvers cannot be underestimated.

Architect Jeanne Gang threads nature into urban landscapes | Lori Rotenberk | Grist
Her fascination with natural and architectural form began in her childhood, when her father, a civil engineer, favored driving back roads during family vacations to marvel at local bridges.

Landscape Architecture Program Appoints New Chair
Gale Fulton, a former assistant professor at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been named chair of University of Tennessee’s Landscape Architecture Program.

Sydney’s Urban Areas To Be Hit Hard By Global Warming | Asian Scientist
Green spaces, trees and bodies of water are must-have design features for future development in Sydney’s suburbs after researchers found that by 2050 global warming combined with Sydney’s urban heat island effect could increase temperatures by up to 3.7°C.

To mark 50 years of Singapore’s green movement: Grow a plant out of a stamp | Strait Times (Sunday)
The four designs in this stamp issue portray Singapore’s vibrant urban landscape nestled within a thriving garden with native plants and wildlife. To commemorate 50 years of greening Singapore, the stamps come in biodegradable paper with the local stamp affixed with seeds of the Portulaca grandiflora.

Why are allotments becoming less popular? | Julian Baggini | Guardian
The waiting lists for allotments are falling – and, yes, they’re a lot of work but the spiritual and psychological benefits make them more than worthwhile

10 Things Adored by Landscape Architect Douglas Hoerr | Heiji Choy Black | Chicago Magazine
A beekeeper’s smoker, Lagavulin Single Malt Scotch, and Felco pruners are just a few of the things this partner at Hoerr Schaudt Landscape Architects treasures.

Il cimitero si fa paesaggio | Liana Pastorin | La Stampa
Piccoli luoghi carichi di storia, ampi spazi a giardino. Il cimitero dialoga con il paesaggio urbano

De profesión, restaurador ecológico | BBC Mundo
“Somos literalmente un grupo de fanáticos apasionados de la naturaleza”, dice para describir a quienes, como él, trabajan en restauración ecológica.

Are these links not enough to feed your reading appetite? Follow us on Twitter @wlandscapearch to get more great landscape links everyday.

Capitol Canopy | Sacramento Capitol Mall Design Competition Winner | ATLAS Lab

Capitol Canopy | Sacramento Capitol Mall Design competition | ATLAS Lab
The urban forest is an important part of every thriving city. Tree canopies provide critical services for the city, including reducing heat island effects though the provision of shade and the creation of microclimates.
Continue reading Capitol Canopy | Sacramento Capitol Mall Design Competition Winner | ATLAS Lab

This Week in Landscape | 25 March 2012

This weeks round-up of landscape news from around the web

Jungleland – The Lower Ninth Ward in New Orleans Gives New Meaning to ‘Urban Growth’ | Nathaniel Rich | New York Times Magazine
The power of nature is shown by the ‘jungle’ that is recolonising parts of the Lower Ninth Ward in New Orleans that have been abandoned since Hurricane Katrina in 2005.

Finding the urban forest in your neck of the woods | Laurie Casey | Chicago Tribune
Boasting millions of trees, other plants, and wildlife, the urban forest contributes valuable benefits. It produces fresh oxygen, reduces urban heat island effects, and stores carbon. Studies show being around or seeing trees even improves our mood and helps us heal from surgery faster.

Cloned trees fuel urban pollen count | Randy Shore | Vancouver Sun
Planting male clones effectively doubles the amount of pollen released, horticulturalist says.

He changed Bangalore’s landscape | Deccan Herald
Gustav Krumbiegel established the Horticultural School in the erstwhile Mysore state, a first for India.

America’s Coolest Driveways | Tanya Mohn | Forbes
“Good driveway design is all about the arrival experience,” says Charles A. Birnbaum, founder and president of The Cultural Landscape Foundation

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Scientists investigate urban climate in the Netherlands

041wubakfietsrotterdam

Reseachers at Wageningen University and Research Centre (WUR) have been riding around Rotterdam and Arnhem in the Netherlands on two trikes mapping and measuring the urban climate during four time intervals on a 24 hour day. The measuring was to study the Urban Heat Island (UHI) effect that often causes heat stress.

The measurements on 6 August in Rotterdam showed that during day time the city centre was two degrees warmer on average than Zestienhoven(Rotterdam) airport, which is located outside the city. A striking observation was that the city park De Twee Heuvelen was 2.4 degrees cooler than Zestienhoven. This means that the differences in the afternoon in the city can rise to 4.4 degrees centigrade. During the late evening (22-24 hours), the city centre was more than 5 degrees warmer than Zestienhoven. The route near the national Green Heart (Doenkade) turned out to be even cooler (2 degrees C) than Zestienhoven. The difference in temperature between the city and countryside consequently amounted to more than 7 degrees during nocturnal hours.

In the late afternoon the felt air temperature – the air temperature perceived by the human body – was 28 degrees C at Zestienhoven, the temperature at the city centre of Rotterdam (in the sun and out of the wind) would feel more than 6 degrees higher – so well above 30° C. Surprisingly, similar effects were measured in the much smaller city of Arnhem.

For the measurements (before sunrise, midday, late afternoon, after sunset), days with maximum temperatures above 25° C were necessary. With the two cargo bikes with measurement equipment, the researchers cycled along two previously determined routes through a number of characteristic urban districts, such as an industrial area, an older residential area, a city park and the harbour area. The researchers plan to take more measurements later this year and in 2010.

SOURCE: Wageningen University and Research Centre (WUR)
IMAGE: Wageningen University and Research Centre (WUR)

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