STUDENT PROJECT | 50,000 trees | Sarah Moos

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A 30-acre site of underutilized space located beneath a multi-level interchange in San Francisco, CA is envisioned as a highly productive sequestering urban forest that humanizes the street level making it accessible, safe, and enjoyable for the public. The design had three primary goals. 1) Combine time, process, and ecology to offset CO2 emissions from the freeway while creating a memorable place. 2) Reduce persistent flooding on this former marshland. 3) Reconnect 2 neighborhoods to each other and to the city’s largest Farmer’s Market.

Continue reading STUDENT PROJECT | 50,000 trees | Sarah Moos

This Week in Landscape | 10 February 2013

Landscape links from around the world this week…

Landscape of professionalism | Brent Bellamy | Winnipeg Free Press
“Landscape architects work as part of a design team to ensure buildings appropriately engage the public realm, strengthening their connection to the human scale.”

The Green Team Part 9: Going Vertical | Terrie Brightman | Metropolis Magazine
The design of exterior vertical surfaces can take on many forms and configurations including green screens, green walls, cable trellis systems, wall-mounted planters, trellises, and planters housing fastigiate (columnar) species, to name a few.

The Great Exchange | Daniel Jost | Landscape Architecture Magazine
“Professors from both sides of the Pacific talk about the amazing cultural exchange happening between American and Chinese universities and the rising stature of landscape architecture in China.”

10 Best Cities for Urban Forests | American Forests
“These cities stood out among the 50 most populous cities in the nation based on a combination of six main criteria….”

Imagining a Drone-Proof City | Sarah Goodyear | Atlantic Cities
“The City hides the individual in the embrace of the community, using human traits drones cannot understand as protection. The City subverts the aggressor.”

IMAGE CREDIT | Flickr user fiat.luxury

Tree decision making tools launched

Tree Reports launched to assist decision makers

Urban Forests and trees are an important of the urban realm and the public, managers and designers require documents to assist in making the informed decisions. Thankfully, three tools were recently launched at the Urban Forests and Sustainable Futures that assist everyone in their pursuit of creating great urban spaces.

The Trees and Design Action Group  launched the Trees in Townscapes Trees in the Townscape, a Guide for Decision Makers, a new guide offers 12 principles of best practice; Neighbourhoods Green launched their web based toolkit Tree Management Toolkit that is intended to provide advice and information to support registered housing providers to develop their tree strategies; and lastly, the i-Tree Report, commissioned by the Victoria Business Improvement  which reveals how trees in Victoria are saving the business community thousands of pounds(GBP) a year.

Continue reading Tree decision making tools launched

Tennessee’s Urban Forests Valued in the Billions

Overton Park | Memphis, Tennessee | Image Credit: Flickr User: duluoz-cats

Tennessee’s urban forests, currently valued at about $80 billion, also provide almost $650 million in benefits such as carbon storage, pollution removal, and energy reduction according to a new U.S. Forest Service report.

The authors of Urban Forests of Tennessee, 2009 (published in early 2012) found there are 284 million trees in urban areas in the state, with canopies covering 33.7 percent of 1.6 million acres of urban area. Those urban forests provide an estimated $204 million per year in pollution removal and $66 million per year in energy savings. The study is the first of its kind in Tennessee.

Continue reading Tennessee’s Urban Forests Valued in the Billions

USA urban forests losing ground

Albuquerque Aerial 2006 (Flickr User kla4067)

National results indicate that tree cover in urban areas of the United States is declining at a rate of about 4 million trees per year, according to a U.S. Forest Service study published recently in Urban Forestry & Urban Greening.

Tree cover in 17 of the 20 cities analyzed in the study declined while 16 cities saw increases in impervious cover, which includes pavement and rooftops. Land that lost trees was for the most part converted to either grass or ground cover, impervious cover or bare soil.

Of the 20 cities analyzed, the greatest percentage of annual loss in tree cover occurred in New Orleans, Houston and Albuquerque. Researchers expected to find a dramatic loss of trees in New Orleans and said that it is most likely due to the devastation of Hurricane Katrina in 2005. Tree cover ranged from a high of 53.9 percent in Atlanta to a low of 9.6 percent in Denver while total impervious cover varied from 61.1 percent in New York City to 17.7 percent in Nashville. Cities with the greatest annual increase in impervious cover were Los Angeles, Houston and Albuquerque.

Continue reading USA urban forests losing ground

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