ULI Announces Finalists For 2014 ULI Gerald D. Hines Student Urban Design Competition

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The Urban Land Institute (ULI) has released the short list of finalist teams in the twelfth annual ULI Gerald D. Hines Student Urban Design Competition. The four graduate-level student teams – representing Georgia Tech University, Harvard University, University of Maryland, and the University of Texas, Austin – will advance to the final round of competition in April. The competition is based on a hypothetical situation in which the site owners, working together as the Sulphur Dell Development Corporation, have asked for a proposal that transforms the historic Sulphur Dell neighborhood. The owner’s request is made with an understanding of the market and nonmarket factors at play in building healthy places and of the value proposition of building and operating in ways that promote health.
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Peter Walker awarded the ULI Prize For Visionaries In Urban Development

The 2012 Urban Land Institute (ULI) J.C. Nichols Prize for Visionaries in Urban Development has been awarded  to landscape architect Peter Walker,  which is the institute’s highest honor. Walker will be honored during ULI’s annual fall meeting October 16-19 in Denver. More information and video of Peter and his thoughts on winning the award after the jump.
Continue reading Peter Walker awarded the ULI Prize For Visionaries In Urban Development

Calls for Collaboration between professions

Susan Szenasy posted on Metropolis an article titled “United We Stand” in which she recalls some government officials giving encouragement at a recent NeoCon East annual trade show that there is “a new day for government design”. Szeasy goes on to talk about the importance to design of the recent $5.5 billion allocation to General Services Administration and the Department of Defense’s $7.4 billion reconfiguration funding.

However the point I found most interesting in Szenasy’s article was the GSA signing of a new accord with AIA, ASLA, IIDA; in which they have pledged to collaborate to achieve design excellence. I find this encouraging that professional associations have come together.

Currently, there is change occurring not just in the short-term with the Global Financial Crisis, but it seems more and more that sustainability, the environment, and climate change is becoming more important to the world. I feel that we need to move forward with new ideas and be armed with new tools especially in the area of urban design where cities are shrinking in the USA, new eco-towns are being built in the UK and new mega-cities are being designed and constructed in China, India, and Africa. Now is the best time to seek out other disciplines for collaboration not just for the networking and possible work opportunities but for the greater good of the profession. As Landscape Architects I know we often seek collaboration with other disciplines whether they are internal or external of our companies, however I think that as we head towards a new decade we should make more of a commitment to further collaborate with other professions to improve your knowledge and their knowledge so that together we can create a better future.

By Damian Holmes

Read the full article that inspired this post at the [SOURCE: Metropolis - United We Stand]

Urban Land Institute appoints new CEO

WASHINGTON (August 3, 2009) – Patrick L. Phillips, President and Chief Executive Officer of ERA AECOM (formerly Economics Research Associates), has been selected as the new Chief Executive Officer of the Urban Land Institute, a global research and education organization dedicated to responsible land use. Phillips is taking over the position being vacated by current ULI CEO Richard M. Rosan, who has led the Institute’s staff for more than 17 years.

Phillips will start at ULI on September 14, 2009. The opportunity to guide ULI staff presents a unique chance to help boost the influence the Institute has on land use both globally and locally, Phillips said. “ULI is clearly the premier research and education organization involving land use. I am thrilled to take on the responsibility for leading an organization that provides such an unbeatable combination of intellectual content and member service.” 

The global recession, he noted, has presented a challenging environment in which ULI must stay relevant and provide high member value. “While ULI has traditionally been viewed through the lens of development and growth, we are facing lower prospects for growth in a number of the established markets we serve worldwide. At the same time, we are starting to have a larger presence in emerging markets. We need to take a fresh look at the entire portfolio of products and services ULI provides to make sure that what we offer reflects member needs, both in times of changing market conditions and for the long term,” Phillips said.

He stressed that ULI’s core priority areas — 1) sustainability, including environmentally and economically viable investment and development; 2) connecting infrastructure and land use planning; 3) workforce housing; and 4) capital markets – continue to be relevant in the current economic environment. In fact, positioning ULI in the dialogs on sustainability and restoring capital flows are two areas of particular urgency, Phillips said. Given the worldwide scope of the discussions and public policy changes related to these issues, “ULI has a profound role to play,” he said.

Rosan, Phillip’s predecessor, will be transitioning fulltime into the role of president of the ULI Foundation, the philanthropic branch of ULI that funds much of its program of work. It is a position he has held simultaneously while serving as ULI’s CEO.

SOURCE: Urban Land Institute