Pottery Road Bicycle and Pedestrian Crossing | Toronto Canada | PLANT Architect

Pottery Road - Toronto Canada - Plant Architect

The Pottery Road Bicycle and Pedestrian Crossing is the first component in a larger scheme to provide interpretation, accessibility, and environmental control for Crothers’ Wood — one of the few remaining fragments of Carolinian forest in Toronto and throughout Canada. The site has been designated an Environmentally Sensitive Area (ESA) by the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority, and is part of the City of Toronto’s Terrestrial Natural Heritage System along the East Don River Valley.

Continue reading Pottery Road Bicycle and Pedestrian Crossing | Toronto Canada | PLANT Architect

Sugar Beach, Toronto | Claude Cormier

Sugar Beach, Toronto | Claude Corimer

View of beach in late summer ©Waterfront Toronto (Nicola Betts)

The revitalization of Toronto’s waterfront is the largest urban redevelopment project currently underway in North America, and is also one of the largest waterfront revitalization efforts ever undertaken in the world. Led by Waterfront Toronto, a joint venture of the Federal, Provincial, and City governments, Canada’s Sugar Beach is one of the first park spaces to open as part of the ambitious waterfront redevelopment masterplan.

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Mega Cities not always the biggest polluters

Mega-cities around the world such as New York, London, Los Angeles, Shanghai are often blamed for the high Green House Gas(GHG) emissions but a recent report released found that cities like Sydney(20.6), Calgary(17.7), Stuttgart(16.0), Denver (21.5), Rotterdam (29.8) CO2 equivalent (tCO2e) per capita where far higher than some of the world’s mega-cities including Shanghai (11.7), Tokyo (4.89), Dehli (1.5), Mexico City (4.25), London (9.6) and New York (10.5) CO2 equivalent (tCO2e) per capita. Although it could be seen that the overall city emissions are high however, when measuring  tCO2e per capita it gives a very different picture.

The report focused on the Canadian city of Toronto and the results were surprising across the city as an inner city resident could have an annual emissions as low as 1.3 tCO2e whereas someone in a sprawling outer suburb could have 13.02 tCO2e. The report has a series of aerial images including high-rise(1.31) to outer suburbia(13.02) with the annual emissions for the area which gives a great insight into urban design and consequent emissions.

Lowest emissions in the study where from apartment dwelling city residents using public transit as there main source of transport.

I recommend reading the report ‘Cities and greenhouse gas emissions: moving forward‘ (10 January 2011) – a free copy is available from Environment & Urbanization

NOTE: Values in brackets () are tonne CO2 equivalent (tCO2e) per capita

New Publication: Scapegoat

A recent post by faslanyc we read about Scapegoat – a new journal on landscape, architecture, and political economy. Its available for free download.

Scapegoat is a publication that engages the political economy of architecture and landscape architecture. The figure of the scapegoat carries the burden of the city and its sins.

Toronto: Can it break free from the Sprawl

Christopher Hume, Architecture Critic for Toronto Star writes in Hume: Resisting the Call of Sprawl

Though suburbia has failed to live up to the promise, its appeal isn’t hard to understand. The damage inflicted on cities during the last 50 or 60 years went a long way to make them unlivable. Even now, the suburbanization of Toronto continues.

Hume looks at various players and how they are enabling each others behaviour.

Read more at [thestar.com]

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