This Week in Landscape | 26 February 2012

This weeks round-up of landscape news and views from around the web

Fresh Kills Park | Flickr User Kristine Paulus

Big City Conservation: New York City’s Hidden Biodiversity | Molly Marquand | Ecology.com
“Where every great city stands today, a natural ecosystem once thrived. London was built on a floodplain of the River Thames; New York was set up on great tracts of oak woodland; and Tokyo, the most populous metropolis in the world, once supported a lush and verdant subtropical forest.”

Vietnam memorial designer says the Earth has lessons to teach us | John Conti | Pittsburgh Tribune-Review
Lin perhaps summed up her work best herself when she quoted a prayer attributed to the Chinook Indians of the Northwest: “We call upon the Earth to teach us and show us the way.”

When Designing Space Moves Outside | Jane Parkins | Architecture Source
Due to its incredible benefits, both physical and mental, the connection between interior and exterior architecture has increased in popularity.

Urban areas need better planning | Elly Burhaini Faizal | Jakarta Post
Poor urban planning and over population have become the main challenges for city administrations in their efforts to minimize fatalities in times of disasters, officials and experts have said.

REWRITING A CITY IN NATURE | Diana Balmori | Urban Design Review
“Our understanding of nature has changed radically. Our ideas about urbanism must catch up. By rewriting the city (a semantic departure from “planning”), we will jar the public to this major scientific and philosophical shift in the interaction of nature and the city.”

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IMAGE CREDIT: Flickr User:  Kristine Paulus

Mega Cities not always the biggest polluters

Mega-cities around the world such as New York, London, Los Angeles, Shanghai are often blamed for the high Green House Gas(GHG) emissions but a recent report released found that cities like Sydney(20.6), Calgary(17.7), Stuttgart(16.0), Denver (21.5), Rotterdam (29.8) CO2 equivalent (tCO2e) per capita where far higher than some of the world’s mega-cities including Shanghai (11.7), Tokyo (4.89), Dehli (1.5), Mexico City (4.25), London (9.6) and New York (10.5) CO2 equivalent (tCO2e) per capita. Although it could be seen that the overall city emissions are high however, when measuring  tCO2e per capita it gives a very different picture.

The report focused on the Canadian city of Toronto and the results were surprising across the city as an inner city resident could have an annual emissions as low as 1.3 tCO2e whereas someone in a sprawling outer suburb could have 13.02 tCO2e. The report has a series of aerial images including high-rise(1.31) to outer suburbia(13.02) with the annual emissions for the area which gives a great insight into urban design and consequent emissions.

Lowest emissions in the study where from apartment dwelling city residents using public transit as there main source of transport.

I recommend reading the report ‘Cities and greenhouse gas emissions: moving forward‘ (10 January 2011) – a free copy is available from Environment & Urbanization

NOTE: Values in brackets () are tonne CO2 equivalent (tCO2e) per capita

Journeys to the East: Arthur Erikson & Japan

Date: 25 Nov 2009, 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm
Location: Vancity Theatre, Vancouver International Film Centre

The Arthur Erickson Conservancy (AEC) presents an illustrated lecture by Professor Michelangelo Sabatino, who, in the summer of 2009, retraced Arthur Erickson’s first journey to Japan in 1961, revisiting the sites Erickson mentioned in his seminal articles in Canadian Architect in the 1960s. Prof. Sabatino will trace Erickson’s journeys and writings on Japan and their effect on his work, including the Canadian Pavilion for Expo ’70 in Osaka.

SOURCE: UBC

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