New York Launches NYC Urban Technology Innovation Center

NYC Urban Technology Innovation Center, an initiative to promote the development and commercialization of green building technologies in New York City.  It will connect academic institutions conducting underlying research, companies creating the associated products, and building owners who will use those technologies. Through the Center – a partnership of the New York City Economic Development Corporation, Columbia University, Polytechnic Institute of New York University, and the City University of New York (CUNY) – green building technology companies that need real-world test sites will be joined with building owners looking to benefit from the latest developments and willing to provide a test environment.

Read more at the NYC Press Release

Walter Hood: ‘Technology/Technique’ @ University of Michigan


Walter Hood, Principal, Hood Design; Professor of Landscape Architecture & Environmental Planning and Urban Design, College of Environmental Design, University of California, Berkeley, presented September 24, 2010, at the Future of Technology conference.

NOTE: The average audio quality will require you to turn up your volume.

International Green Construction Code launched

Version 1.0 of the International Green Construction Code(IGCC) was launched by the International Code Council. Of interest to Landscape Architects is Chapter 4 – Site development and land use which

provides requirements for the development and maintenance of building and building sites that encourage natural resource conservation and environmentally responsible land use and development.

This chapter addresses soils, land use and conservation, storm water, irrigation, graywater, vegetation, building site management, transport, bicycle & vehicle parking, hardscape, vegetative roofs, lighting. Version 1.0 was undertaken with American Institute of Architects (AIA), ASTM International, ASHRAE, USGBC and IES with the inclusion of ASHRAE Standard 189.1 as an option for jurisdictional requirements. Version 1.0 of the code is open for public comment and then a Version 2.0 will be released in November 2010.

The IGCC aims to significantly reduce energy usage and greenhouse gasses. Enforcement of the code will improve indoor air quality and support the use of energy-efficient appliances, renewable energy systems, water resource conservation, rainwater collection and distribution systems, and the recovery of used water (greywater).

The IGCC emphasizes building performance, including features such as a requirement for building system performance verification and building owner education to ensure the best energy-efficient practices. A key feature of the new code is a section devoted to “jurisdictional electives” that will allow customization of the code beyond its baseline provisions to address local priorities and conditions.

Read more and download the IGCC (pdf or word format) at the [SOURCE: ICC] via Dexigner

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What does it take to save a species?

Sometimes, high-voltage power wires according to the article written by Beth Daley for The Boston Globe

Beth writes

In a 250-foot-wide power line corridor off Route 163 in Southeastern Connecticut. Transmission corridors have long been considered symbols of environmental degradation, with their enormous steel skeletons and high-voltage lines slicing through forests, wetlands, and salt marshes; they divide the landscapes that thousands of species need to survive. Yet now they are gaining a new reputation: As critical homes for faltering species of birds, bees, butterflies, plants, and a host of other species.

Read the full article at the SOURCE: The Boston Globe – Green Lines

Annapolis’ floating wetland

baltimoresun.com reports

Annapolis intends to test a floating island in a local lagoon that, if successful, could help clean the water in the Chesapeake Bay, according to Mayor Ellen O. Moyer……
Floating islands are created from recycled plastics and planted with wetland plants that soak up nutrients from the water, said Steve Carr, the city’s environmental adviser. He said the project in Annapolis will act as a test to see whether the technology can be implemented in larger areas of the bay.

For more information about Annapolis’ floating wetland go to the [SOURCE: baltimoresun.com - Annapolis' floating 'wetland' could help restore the bay]

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