Ecological Agriculture: can it feed the world?

The latest edition of the Monthly Review (November 2009, Volume 61, Number 6) includes a paper from Jules Pretty is professor of environment and society at the University of Essex, UK. titled Can Ecological Agriculture Feed Nine Billion People?

Below is an extract from the paper

Something is wrong with our agricultural and food systems.Despite great progress in increasing productivity in the last century, hundreds of millions of people remain hungry and malnourished. Further hundreds of millions eat too much, or consume the wrong sorts of food, and it is making them ill. The health of the environment suffers too, as degradation of soil and water seems to accompany many of the agricultural systems we have developed in recent years. Can nothing be done, or is it time for the expansion of an agriculture founded more on ecological principles and in harmony with people, their societies, and cultures?

Read the full paper at the [SOURCE: MonthlyReview - Can Ecological Agriculture Feed Nine Billion People?]

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The Rooftop Garden Climbs Down a Wall

Ken Belson of the New York Times has written an interesting piece about green walls which looks at the green wall as a source of food production. Belson talks to a varied number of designers, universities and manufacturers about the green walls as food production. He also states that at $500 a panel they aren’t for everyone.

Belson has a great quote he cites from Paul Mankiewicz, the executive director of the Gaia Institute in New York.

“We have 30 miles of rooftop in New York City and maybe 3,000 miles of walls,”

Read the article at the SOURCE: New York Times – The Rooftop Garden Climbs Down a Wall

Timeless Design in a Sustainable World: Charles F. Gillette Forum

If one legacy of the 20th century is its architectural prowess, might the 21st century be devoted to developing exquisite green spaces between the buildings where we live, work, and play?  All around the world, growing urban populations are seeking communal spaces—parks, squares, plazas, piazzas, greenways and gardens—as essential components of daily life, places of respite and reflection, recreation, and celebration. This symposium will examine timeless principles of design—whether applied to the creation of a residential garden or a public space—that connect us to the natural world and in so doing, fulfill man’s innate desire for association with other living things.  The symposium honors the legacy of Charles F. Gillette, a leader in the field of landscape architecture, by engaging the public in a conversation about the importance of landscape design and the value of Gillette’s ideals of elegance, superb craftsmanship, and seamless blending of architecture and garden.

Featuring: Douglas Reed, FALSA, of Reed Hilderbrand Associates, Watertown, MA  and Thomas Woltz, ALSA, of Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architecture Firm, Charlottesville, VA

The Gillette Forum AGENDA is now on-line!

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