Penn State students help rebuild stormwater systems in Philadelphia

WBGS Philadelphia2

Wilson Lee, a junior in the landscape architecture program, wiped the sweat and dirt from his brow under a hot October sun. Along a busy street in the heart of central Philadelphia, Lee joined a group of other Penn State students, staff and community volunteers to revamp two green infrastructure sites in the city he calls home. “I’ve been around central Philly a lot and have seen places similar to this throughout the city,” Wilson said. “It’s nice to come in and rehabilitate my community with projects and rain gardens like this. Everyone who has walked by has been appreciative of what we’re doing.”

Continue reading Penn State students help rebuild stormwater systems in Philadelphia

This Week in Landscape | 20 January 2013

This Week’s landscape links

The Green Team Part 7: From Field to Park | Lisa DuRussel | Metropolis Magazine
“The landscape architect’s job doesn’t end when she leaves the nursery. The trees we’ve selected must be maintained, cared for, and prepped in anticipation of delivering them to the project for installation. ”

The 1934 Plan to Fill In the Hudson River for $1 Billion | Jessica Dailey | Curbed
“In 1934, an engineer named Norman Sper proposed filling in the Hudson River to create an additional ten square miles for city development.”

Peavey Plaza Now Registered As Historic Place | CBS Minnesota
Downtown Minneapolis’ Peavey Plaza has been listed in the National Register of Historic Places, The Cultural Landscape Foundation (TCLF) announced Thursday.

Reuse and the Cultural Landscape | Vince Michael | Time tells
“In a real sense, the challenge is to fine-tune our approaches so that we can find new markets, new functions, new value in both elements of a cultural landscape: the tangible and the intangible.”

Guide To Integrate Green Infrastructure Into Stormwater Permits | Jeffrey Odefey | American Rivers
“Polluted runoff remains a significant source of pollution largely because the permits that regulate it are based on a poorly defined and highly discretionary standard that calls for measures that reduce stormwater “to the maximum extent practicable.” ”

Who’s on First? Unlocking the potential of dispersed teams | Maria Manion, Rachel Casanova, & Roshelle Ritzenthaler | ideas+buildings
7 points that Perkins+Will have shared their best practices with a growing population of remote teams

University of Manitoba LA students win $25,000

A team from the Landscape Architecture program at University of Manitoba was one of the four teams awarded $25,000 from the $100,000 Go Green Challenge, a competition funded by the TD Friends of the Environment foundation (TDFEF), a national organization formed by TD Bank and Financial Group.

Aileen Zubriski and Kathryn Voroney, two masters students in Landscape Architecture at the University of Manitoba, made up the winning team for their proposal, prize with their project “Uncovering Water: Exposing the Storm Water System Through Sustainable Design.”. The proposal consisted of using bio-retention filters, green roofs and permeable paving to reduce the amount of runoff water that flows into the city’s sewer systems — stopping raw sewage from entering the Red River every time the system tops out and overflows, which happens an average of 18 times per summer.

[SOURCE: The Manitoban]

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Australia allocates $86 mil for stormwater harversting

Thirteen organisations will share in $86 million to undertake innovative stormwater capture projects to help secure water supplies for Australian cities.

Minister for Climate Change and Water, Senator Penny Wong, announced recently the outcome of the first funding round for Stormwater Harvesting and Reuse Projects

“In this era of extended drought and the emerging effects of climate change, we need to invest in alternative water supplies and make better use of the water we have available for our cities and towns,” Senator Wong said.

“The combined yield from these projects is estimated to be 9 billion litres per annum.”

The projects will also reduce stormwater pollution in local waterways and help maintain parks and gardens.
The projects will source 100 per cent of their energy needs from renewable sources or fully offset the carbon impact of the project’s operations.

A second round for funding applications has been extended to 10 February 2010

SOURCE: Minister for Climate Change and Water – Australia

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