Foothill College | Los Altos California | Meyer + Silberberg Land Architects

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Foothill College serves as an influential example of the integration of Landscape Architecture and Architecture in post World War II modernism and was immediately bestowed many top awards upon completion.  One of the first junior colleges built after World War, and originally designed by architect Ernest Kump and landscape architect Peter Walker, the campus master plan was structured around the idea of an “acropolis”, with the campus located at the top of the hill.  Vehicles were relegated to the edges of the campus, and the pedestrian oriented campus core was dignified and tranquil.  A rolling campus green, large central grove and intimate academic courts that were an extension of the classroom pavilions created a successful hierarchy of landscape spaces and employed a distinct design language whose structural clarity remains today.  Withstanding the test of time the project was awarded the ASLA National Classic Award in 1993.

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Imagining the Lowline exhibit opens

Imagining the Lowline exhibit opens
Last Saturday the “Imagining the Lowline” exhibit opened to the public as part of the “Experiments in Motion” initiative commissioned by Audi of America and in partnership with the Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation (GSAPP), nine student visions will be presented along with a 45-foot-long suspended model of Manhattan’s subway grid that contextualizes the Lowline within the city’s huge inventory of underground spaces.

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This Week in Landscape | 5 February 2012

This weeks round-up of landscape news and views from around the web

Emotional Landscapes: Interview with landscape architect Michael Van Valkenburgh | Gideon Fink Shapiro | BMW Guggenheim Lab
Michael Van Valkenburgh interview about urban landscapes and what they can do

The architecture meltdown | Scott Timberg | Salon
With the economy still in the doldrums where does architecture go from here?

How should we design urban parks? | The Urban Portal | University of Chicago
A social science look at parks, the important differences and the costs of parks in cities.

Building green cities using public/private partnerships | Matthew Kahn | Christian Science Monitor
Public funding for environmentally friendly urban centers benefits private investors, too

Re-greening the Plateau |Michelle Lalonde | Montreal Gazette
Residents are fighting to save their street trees, even if it means removing parking spots

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Walter Hood Profile [VIDEO]

Walter Hood is the principal of Hood Design in Oakland USA and also a Professor at the University of California, Berkeley. His work has a strong connection to working with communities and their spaces.  In this short 3 minute video (for Architectural Digest and Delta)  Walter Hood talks about some of his projects and also his approach to design.

“…paying attention to where you are and the people around you and out of that comes the expression”

Walter Hood

Architectural Digest Walter Hood from guggenheim productions on Vimeo.

Washington Square Plaza | San Francisco | estudioOCA

Washington Square Plaza | San Francisco | estudioOCA

Seating ribbon and public lawn at the metro entrance.

This study for the treatment of the future subway extension to North Beach takes into consideration the historic value of the neighborhood and existing park, and attempts to create an improved pedestrian experience while minimizing the impact on the community. The proposed plaza replaces a small, inaccessible landscaped area and a short section of Powell Street, creating a unified pedestrian plaza containing the primary subway entrance, public seating, a public lawn, and outdoor dining areas for the existing restaurants. Views down Powell Street to the bay are maintained.

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