Pottery Road Bicycle and Pedestrian Crossing | Toronto Canada | PLANT Architect

Pottery Road - Toronto Canada - Plant Architect

The Pottery Road Bicycle and Pedestrian Crossing is the first component in a larger scheme to provide interpretation, accessibility, and environmental control for Crothers’ Wood — one of the few remaining fragments of Carolinian forest in Toronto and throughout Canada. The site has been designated an Environmentally Sensitive Area (ESA) by the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority, and is part of the City of Toronto’s Terrestrial Natural Heritage System along the East Don River Valley.

Continue reading Pottery Road Bicycle and Pedestrian Crossing | Toronto Canada | PLANT Architect

Town of Kansas Enhancements | Kansas City USA | KEM STUDIO

The existing Town of Kansas pedestrian bridge in Kansas City, Missouri received some enhancements to the positive experience it currently enjoys. Kansas City as we know it today originated as the “Town of Kansas” when Lewis and Clark first stopped here while traversing the Missouri River and is the beginning of the cities Main Street.
Continue reading Town of Kansas Enhancements | Kansas City USA | KEM STUDIO

This Week in Landscape | 24 June 2012

This weeks round-up of landscape news from around the web.

 Sustainability without fanfare | Thomas R. Tavella, FASLA | Sustainable Industries
Landscape architecture has quietly employed sustainable principles for decades.

The Real High Line Effect: A Transformational Triumph of Preservation and Design | Charles A. Birnbaum | Huffington Post
Charles A. Birnbaum (The Cultural Landscape Foundation) blog post.  “Several cities are looking at their own long disused sections of track, hoping they can literally replicate New York’s success. Perhaps, but that narrow interpretation ignores the confluence of unique factors that made New York’s High Line an instant classic.”

Can You Get People To Walk More, Simply With Smart Signage? | Jordan Kushins | Fast Co Design
The successful Kickstarter campaign hopes handy signs will get people walking.

A lesson from a great architect | Seth Godin
If you don’t get it built, the work doesn’t matter.

 MONO LAKE | Michael Light | Venue
…fly around the shores of Mono Lake, California, with celebrated aerial photographer

Send us your links during the week to contribute@worldlandscapearchitect.com

Signage Guidelines can reduce clutter in the landscape

The image of US 280 in Michael Tomberlin’s post – Birmingham committee revisiting sign rules is very telling of the suburban landscape where signs breed like rabbits and litter the road side with retailers using the mantra ‘the bigger the better’ rather than ‘less is more’. Signage littering the urban landscape is not endemic to just Birmingham or the USA for that matter, all across the globe streetscapes are littered with A-Frames blackboard signs, bus stop advertising and billboards. But do they really urge passers by to go and shop or are they just landmarks to designate the location of the store? I think it is the latter and that all cities should have formulate signage guidelines (many already do) including the number of signs allowed and the size.

Guidelines should also go further to streetscape and city government signage & intepretation. Often towns and city landscapes becomes a minefield of directional, parking and place marking signs that have been added layer by layer by various departments and changes of staff who continually add more signage to the landscape. All cities should at the least evaluate their main streetscapes and see where they can reduce the clutter to provide a clean landscape that is visually easy to navigate and often more pedestrian friendly. Often city signage for an area can be easily amalgamated into one sign(or sign family) such as place marking and area parking restrictions.

Read more about what Birmingham is proposing at [al.com]