LakeSim prototype connects urban planning with scientific models for large-scale development

The team involved in designing the Chicago Lakeside Development is utilizing computational modeling for the massive 600-acre, urban development planned for the South Side of Chicago, along Lake Michigan. Courtesy of Chicago Lakeside Development/McCaffery Interests

The team involved in designing the Chicago Lakeside Development is utilizing computational modeling for the massive 600-acre, urban development planned for the South Side of Chicago, along Lake Michigan.
Image Courtesy of Chicago Lakeside Development/McCaffery Interests

LakeSim is a collaboration between University of Chicago, Argonne National Laboratory, the Computation Institute, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill and McCaffery to develop a prototype computational framework for Chicago Lakeside development. Planning for Chicago Lakeside will necessitate augmenting traditional tools with data and scientific computation, allowing developers to model the complex interplay between energy, waste and water infrastructures.

Continue reading LakeSim prototype connects urban planning with scientific models for large-scale development

This Week In Landscape | 28 April 2013

With nature in mind | Harvard Gazette
A video of Kongjian Yu focusing on the problems presented by China’s rapid urbanization, espousing a philosophy that would have planners consider the environment first.

Are Landscape Architects & Engineers Frenemies? | Nathalie Shanstrom | Sustainable Cities Collaborative
“Successful design of trees as stormwater infrastructure requires a collaborative, holistic approach that can satisfy the needs of both specialties.”

What’s Your Major: Landscape Architecture | Reema Abi-Akar | The Daily Illini
“Every time you touch the land, you make an impact on it,” Reynolds said. “So we really try to learn in ways that are … going to grow and help the community economically and socially.”

A Six-Year Grassroots Effort Planted in Time for Earth Day | studionelevenblog
A not-so-uncommon conversation between neighbors about the lack of pedestrian safety on their street escalated into an urban intervention that would reshape and green one of the busiest streets of their Long Beach, CA neighborhood.

Grand Opening for Bullitt Center and McGilvra Place Park | berger partnership
Earth Day marked the grand opening for the Bullitt Center and McGilvra Place Park.

Jerusalem wins design award for park | By Daniel K. Eisenbud | The Jerusalem Post
“The Jerusalem Municipality won an award for the design and construction of the Railroad Park.” Jerusalem Railway Park by Tichnun-Nof Landscape Architects.

This Week in Landscape | 9 September 2012

Luanda Angola | Credit Tio Gegeca

This weeks landscape links from around the world

 Designers don’t always know what’s best | Michael Short | smh.com.au
A single mother in a Cambodian slum inspired Lucinda Hartley(Urban designer, landscape architect and activist) to change the world.

Reflections from OLIN’s Interns | OLIN Blog
Interns from OLIN’s  ten-week internship program give their thoughts on what they learned.

Budding landscape architect Viktor Filipi | Radio Praha
“Landscape or garden architecture is a bit of an unusual field. Like classic architecture it also allows you to create, but we are working not with static elements but with vegetation and also time…….”

Landscape Architecture Accessibility and Communication | Lucy Wang | Landscape Architecture Foundation
 “….What’s most interesting to me is what social media can do for promoting the awareness of green space, and ultimately, lead to a better public understanding of landscape architecture…”

UN calls for policies to address rapid urbanization in developing countries
 A United Nations official has called for the development of national urban policies to ensure developing countries are not overwhelmed by urbanization, which he compared to a tsunami for its staggering growth which can surpass cities’ capacities to manage it.

As Temps Rise, Cities Combat ‘Heat Island’ Effect | Richard Harris | NPR
More than 20,000 high-temperature records have been broken so far this year in the United States. And the heat is especially bad in cities, which are heating up about twice as fast as the rest of the planet.

IMAGE CREDIT: Flickr User tio gegeaca

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