This Week in Landscape | 27 July 2014

Weekly round-up of landscape news and interesting articles.

At 93, Cornelia Hahn Oberlander is still one of Canada’s most beloved landscape architects | Sarah Hampson | Globe & Mail
“Over her decades-long career, Hahn Oberlander has overseen some of the most important postwar landscaping projects in North America, including Robson Square in her hometown of Vancouver.”

[Landscape] Architect brings fresh spin to Maggie Daley Park | Chicago Tribune
“Strolling through Maggie Daley Park, stubble on his face and a yellow hard hat covering his graying red hair, Michael Van Valkenburgh paused before the contours of an undulating ice skating loop that will weave through a stand of evergreens.”

Treating Trees as Actual Infrastructure | Leda Marritz | Sustainable Cities Collective
“I asked three people with tons of experience in trees and in urban forestry – who are also frequent contributors to this blog – to pick just five things that would be necessary if we actually treated urban trees and soils (green infrastructure) as seriously as we do pipes, sewers, roads, and more”

Continue reading This Week in Landscape | 27 July 2014

Student Project | New Urban Cemetery: Departures 1 & 2 | Tyler Allen Bradt

10_release-ceremony
Cemeteries in North America almost exclusively all follow the same model – the Garden Cemetery of 1831 Mount Auburn, based on a concept of vast naturalized space. It is no longer 1831 and local and world issues have shifted along with our values and our cultural community. The traditional design has served its purpose in most major cities on the continent. It is pervasive and it is time to consider its effects and consequences on the city. Our modern communities are faced with new challenges unforeseen 200 years ago, such as increased multiculturalism, densification of urban cores rather than expansion of suburbs, environmental challenges, and a shift towards a more economically polarized society.
Continue reading Student Project | New Urban Cemetery: Departures 1 & 2 | Tyler Allen Bradt

Should humans dictate nature in the name of conservation? – The Globe and Mail

The Globe and Mail reports

On naked patches of land in Western Canada and the United States, scientists are planting trees that don’t belong there. It’s a bold experiment to move trees threatened by global warming into places where they may thrive amid a changing climate.

read more @ the SOURCE: The Globe and Mail – Should humans dictate nature in the name of conservation?