This Week In Landscape | 18 August 2013

A weekly summary of links from around the world to keep you informed about the latest news in landscape architecture

How urban scars are being remade into vibrant, vital playgrounds | Alex Bozikovic | Globe & Mail
“One of the mistakes of the late 20th century was to think of parks as an escape from the city,” says Michael Van Valkenburgh, the landscape architect whose office is designing Corktown Common. “I think it’s very different to think of a park as an essential piece of the city, as opposed to ‘not urban.’”

Q&A: Kim Mathews and Signe Nielsen | Susan S. Szenasy| Metropolis Magazine
“Here the principals of the New York firm, Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects, Kim Mathews, RLA, ASLA and Signe Nielsen, RLA, FASLA, talk about the evolution of their profession, their commitment to teaching, writing, lecturing, their research-informed work, as well as the new appreciation of design in the public realm.”

He beautifies an already beautiful San Diego | Nina Garin | UT San Diego
“Landscape architect Glen Schmidt is responsible for some of the county’s best outdoor spaces”

Can you see the landscape architecture for the trees? | Christopher Vollan | Rize
Landscape architecture, at its best, is much more than the arrangement of greenery, furniture and lawn. Like building architecture, it requires deep knowledge of site history and characteristics balanced with future intentions. As a reflection of our high aspirations in this regard, @MtPleasant2016 is proud to have engaged PWL Landscape architects…”

ASLA survey shows uneven economic picture for Landscape Architecture firms | ASLA
Landscape architecture firms are experiencing sluggish but steady growth as they emerge from the recession, according to the American Society of Landscape Architects’ second quarter 2013 Business Quarterly survey.

Continue reading This Week In Landscape | 18 August 2013

2012 In Review | July

In July we had the opportunity to publish the Dead Sea Development Zone Master Plan in Amman, Jordan by Sasaki Associates, Hunts Point Landing in the Bronx USA by Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects (which later opened in October) and the interesting installation by Arteologie by Atelier 37.2 in Auvergne France


Dead Sea Development Zone Master Plan in Amman, Jordan

Continue reading 2012 In Review | July

This Week in Landscape | 12 August 2012

back from a hiatus here is the “This Week in Landscape” links from across the globe.

 The Green Team: Part 1 | Metropolis Magazine
Terrie Brightman and Lisa DuRussel along with others from Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects have started blogging  about landscape architecture at the Metropolis Magazine

Tree Massacre At Queens Borough Hall | Geoffrey Croft | A Walk In The Park
It was cheaper for a city to cut down trees and buy new trees than to move the existing trees – the epitome of waste and bureaucracy?

Q&A: Diana Balmori | Jared Green | Metropolis Magazine
“There will be no remedy but to put the architecture and landscape together. Both architects and landscape architects are starting to work in ways that imitate nature in the way that it functions.” Diana Balmori

John Magee’s Native Landscape Designs Create Habitat for Wildlife | Al Bredenberg | Inhabitat
“Even as habitat becomes more and more disrupted by development, we’re creating more and more little islands of habitat. Wildlife can move and migrate from one to another of them.”

An Architect’s Vision: Bare Elegance in China | Jane Perlez | New York Times
“I love Manhattan. It’s a very interesting place. But if you want to copy something that was accomplished in 200 years, it’s very difficult. New York was not designed by architects, it was designed by time.”

You can send in tips to contribute@worldlandscapearchitect.com

Hunts Point Landing | Bronx USA | Mathews Nielsen

Hunts Point Landing | Bronx USA |  Mathews Nielsen
Hunts Point Landing is a significant component of the South Bronx Greenway Master Plan. It will provide public access to the waterfront and links to other bicycle and pedestrian improvements currently in progress. A key project goal is to integrate public recreation with sustainable design practices, such as biofiltration. The site’s shape (825 feet long by 100 feet wide) derives from its former use as a street and will be used to organize program activities that transition from more active and intensively used in the upland sector to more passive and water-based toward the restored shoreline.
Continue reading Hunts Point Landing | Bronx USA | Mathews Nielsen