This Week In Landscape | 6 October 2013

Shutdown
WLA’s weekly review of landscape news and interesting reading…..

National Parks: Shutting Down America’s Best Idea | Kenneth Brower | National Geographic
“The national parks hold the landscapes that formed us as Americans. The long vistas, the possibilities over the horizon, the purple mountains’ majesty, distinguished our experience from that of the Africans, Europeans, Asians, and islanders that we were before we came. The national parks are where we go to renew contact with that experience…. ”

Redesigning New York’s Hidden Public Spaces To Create A More Resilient City | Eric Tan | Fast Co. Exist
“There’s a lot of space in the city that we don’t think about–medians, for instance. But it’s all an opportunity to introduce better urban design that makes the city more beautiful and more responsive to a disaster.”

Landscape Architects Take Centre Stage in Climate Crisis | Kristen Avis | Sourceable
“Landscape architects are integral in climate change mitigation and work with regional and national planning departments to implement strategies and mitigation designs.”

Teresa Galí-Izard: A Woman of Two Minds | Margaret Baldwin | Sustainable Cities Collective
“Teresa Galí-Izard, International ASLA, is a woman of two minds. At the University of Virginia’s School of Architecture, where she just began her first year as chair of the landscape architecture department….”

WVU students study old foundry, brainstorm plans | John McVey | The Journal
“West Virginia University spent the afternoon Thursday touring the old Matthews Foundry and sketching possible redevelopment plans for the historic industrial site on the north end of downtown Martinsburg.”

Interns Resist Working Free | Ella Delany | NY Times
“A backlash against unpaid internships in America, manifested in a spate of lawsuits this year, is now spreading to Europe, where the issue of exploitation hit headlines in August with the death of the German intern Moritz Erhardt…”

Catch more updates by following us on twitter @wlandscapearch

This Week In Landscape | 3 March 2013

This Week In Landscape | 3 March 2013

Vancouver | Coal Harbour | Flickr User alans1948

Landscape links from around the world during the week of 25 February to 3 March 2013

Landscape Performance Research: The Economics of Change | Jason Twill, LEED AP and Stuart Cowan, PhD | Landscape Architecture Foundation
The overarching goal of The Economics of Change is to shift mainstream real estate practices to document the full value of a built environment that is compatible with healthy, natural systems.

The Most Important Urban Design Decision Vancouver Ever Made? | Brent Toderian | Huffington Post
“In 1997, the city approved its first transformative Transportation Plan. Co-written through a first-time (and not easy) partnership between city planners and transportation engineers, the plan was a game-changer for our city-making model in many ways….”

The Green Team Part 10: POPS for the People…and the Developer | Zeina Zahalan | Metropolis Magazine
“The primary goal of POPS is to unite function with aesthetics—to create public spaces that provide respite in the city’s dense urban fabric.”

Urbanization of the People Must Follow That of the Land | Lan Fang | Caixin
The core of urbanization lies not only in large-scale city building and expansion of industrial parks, but also in the great migration of people from farm villages into cities.

Pedestrian Friendly Streetscape in Santa Cruz | William Langston | A Landscape Architect and a Passport
“So when we were in Puerto Ayora, Santa Cruz Island I was immediately taken by the impressive streetscape improvements to the main streets in town.”

Sequestration Frustration, Close to Home | OLIN Blog
“Clearly the politics of this question run deep, and as advocates of the urban public realm, we can’t hope to remain unbiased. But maybe if we, as advocates and citizens, can join the conversation, we can encourage the power players in Washington to start talking as well.”

A Blog’s Adieu | New York Times
Sadly, the New York Times Green blog has been shutdown to focus on other areas.

IMAGE CREDIT | Flickr User alans1948

This Week In Landscape | 16 September 2012


Another week of landscape links from around the world
The Big Task of Managing Nature at New York’s Central Park | Charles A. Birnbaum | The Cultural Landscape Foundation
“Central Park faces unprecedented use, along with changing climatic conditions and an onslaught of severe weather events. Additionally, increasing knowledge and proven notions about ecological restoration have added a new dimension to this century-and-a-half long conversation about how we interact with our environment and manage our idealized version of nature.”

Green walls ‘need building code’ to reduce fire hazard
“A SYDNEY landscape architect is pushing for green walls to be regulated under building and fire safety codes after he recently saw one go up in flames at a local bar.”

Urban Forestry for Symbolizing Eco-City | Md. Zahidur Rahman and Saeed Ahmed Siddiquee | Blitz
“Currently, unplanned urbanization resulted ecological imbalances in the city. FAO (2008) pointed out that Dhaka city has 21.57% open space where city parks belong to 0.89% and 0.02% for urban forest, garden for 0.90% and 12.12% for agriculture to meets the ecological balance of the city dwellers.”

African Ministers Adopt Programmes to Boost Sustainable Development, Eye Key Role in Post-Rio+20 Landscape | UNEP

What architects do doesn’t count | Jody Brown | Coffee with an Architect
“Because we don’t design the destination. We design the path.”

Fire-Resistant Plant List for the California Supplemental Exam | CSE for Landscape Architects
“These plants will eventually burn if the fire conditions are hot and dry enough, but they resist ignition better than many other species.”

Exploring the Upper West Side’s Riverside Park South | Curbed NY
“Riverside Park South offers up one of the Manhattan’s best opportunities to consider the city’s past as an industrial hub while considering the future of its waterfront. ”

IMAGE CREDIT: Flickr User Ed Yourdon

This Week in Landscape | 26 August 2012

Highline
Another week of great landscape links from around the world.

Disney World on the Hudson | Jeremiah Moss | NY Times Op-ed
This article sparked debate this week as Moss came out and stated that “The High Line has become a tourist-clogged catwalk and a catalyst for some of the most rapid gentrification in the city’s history.” Causing a few interesting conversations on the interwebs.

With Funding Tight, Cities are Turning to Green Infrastructure | Jim Robbins | Yale Environment 360
“We’re at a tipping point,” says Katherine Baer of American Rivers, which is working with communities to implement green infrastructure.

Making Green a Primary Color | Harvard Magazine
“Let’s look at the city as an ecological or biological system,” says (Charles) Waldheim.

A Land Art Sanctuary Filled With Eye-Bending Masterpieces | Cliff Kuang | Fast Co.Design
Gibbs has spent the last two decades commissioning notable artists to work on the farm, collecting a menagerie of roughly two dozen pieces that he calls “a sanctuary for the senses.”

Los Angeles Puts a New Park at Its Heart | Jennifer Medina | NY Times (sydicated)
A long article about Grand Park in LA without a mention of the designers – Rios Clementi Hale Studios

Dismayed by a monastery garden’s disrepair, landscape architect resurrects it | Doug Oster | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
She was determined to renovate the garden. The first step was getting permission.

IMAGE CREDIT: Flickr User m.gifford

This Week in Landscape | 29 April 2012

This weeks round-up of landscape news from around the web.

On an Urban Heat Island, Zippy Red Oaks | Douglas Main | NY Times
Red oak seedlings in Central Park grow up to eight times faster than their cousins cultivated outside the city, probably because of the urban “heat island” effect…

Michigan prepares to deregulate occupations | Jack Lessenberry | The Windsor Star
After regulating the landscape architecture profession back in 2010, Michigan is looking to deregulate landscape architecture in 2012.

The Landscapes of Region 11′s Built System | Urban Omnibus
A interview with Jim Lau about the recent projects by NYDOT in Region 11

Star architects unveil wild plans for Union Station circa 2050 |  Christopher Hawthorne | LA Times
LA Times architecture critic  Christopher Hawthorne gives a brief summary on the visions for Union Station presented by architects seeking to win the project.

Turning Unused Acres Green | John Leland | NY Times
Looking at how 596 Acres is changing Brooklyn’s unused land.

Send us your links during the week to contribute@worldlandscapearchitect.com

For more news during the week become a World Landscape Architecture fan on Facebook,  Join our LinkedIN group,  Follow us on Twitter @wlandscapearch or Weibo and then  Circle us on Google+

1 2 3
RSS FEED EMAIL SUBSCRIPTION Follow Us on Twitter Join Our LinkedIN Group Become a Fan on Facebook Circle us on google+

LATEST WLA MAGAZINE

MAGAZINE SPECIAL EDITIONS