This Week in Landscape | 25 March 2012

This weeks round-up of landscape news from around the web

Jungleland – The Lower Ninth Ward in New Orleans Gives New Meaning to ‘Urban Growth’ | Nathaniel Rich | New York Times Magazine
The power of nature is shown by the ‘jungle’ that is recolonising parts of the Lower Ninth Ward in New Orleans that have been abandoned since Hurricane Katrina in 2005.

Finding the urban forest in your neck of the woods | Laurie Casey | Chicago Tribune
Boasting millions of trees, other plants, and wildlife, the urban forest contributes valuable benefits. It produces fresh oxygen, reduces urban heat island effects, and stores carbon. Studies show being around or seeing trees even improves our mood and helps us heal from surgery faster.

Cloned trees fuel urban pollen count | Randy Shore | Vancouver Sun
Planting male clones effectively doubles the amount of pollen released, horticulturalist says.

He changed Bangalore’s landscape | Deccan Herald
Gustav Krumbiegel established the Horticultural School in the erstwhile Mysore state, a first for India.

America’s Coolest Driveways | Tanya Mohn | Forbes
“Good driveway design is all about the arrival experience,” says Charles A. Birnbaum, founder and president of The Cultural Landscape Foundation

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This Week in Landscape | 18 March 2012

This weeks round-up of landscape news from around the web

Biologists question viability of St. Petersburg Pier’s Underwater Garden plans | Craig Pittman and Waveney Ann Moore | Tampa Bay Times
“Los Angeles-based designer of the Lens, Michael Maltzan Architecture, contended in an email to the Times that the Underwater Garden “is based on sound principles of estuary restoration and species diversification that have been applied and proven effective throughout Tampa Bay.”

The bioswales of New York: A city plan to make more tree-stands and less sewage runoff | Dan Rosenblum | Capital New York
Dan gives a brief introduction to bioswales in New York and some background to bioswales.

Jakarta to Plan City Through 2025 | Ronna Nirmala | Jakarta Post
Jakarta, one of the largest cities in Asia has announced that it is currently developing a plan for the city through to 2025.

Urban underground planning in Vietnam neglected | Tuoitrenews.com.vn
Master planning in Vietnam is not just limited to the above ground landscape – the underground also needs a masterplan.

Tide waits for no man: The amazing beach artist who starts every day with a new canvas | Rachel Richkard Straus
Artist Andres Amador creates intricate land art works in the sand that are washed away in hours

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High Line Section 3 design unveiled

High Line Section 3 Designs Unveiled

The new landscape at the rail yards will extend the park’s distinctive design vocabulary established south of West 30th Street. Credit: James Corner Field Operations and Diller Scofidio + Renfro

Friends of the High Line Co-Founder Robert Hammond was joined by the New York City Parks & Recreation Commissioner Adrian Benepe and members of the High Line Design Team to present initial design concepts for Section 3 of the High Line, the final stretch of the historic freight rail line that has been converted to a public park, that will wrap around the Hudson Yards between West 30th and West 34th Streets.
Continue reading High Line Section 3 design unveiled

This Week in Landscape | 26 February 2012

This weeks round-up of landscape news and views from around the web

Fresh Kills Park | Flickr User Kristine Paulus

Big City Conservation: New York City’s Hidden Biodiversity | Molly Marquand | Ecology.com
“Where every great city stands today, a natural ecosystem once thrived. London was built on a floodplain of the River Thames; New York was set up on great tracts of oak woodland; and Tokyo, the most populous metropolis in the world, once supported a lush and verdant subtropical forest.”

Vietnam memorial designer says the Earth has lessons to teach us | John Conti | Pittsburgh Tribune-Review
Lin perhaps summed up her work best herself when she quoted a prayer attributed to the Chinook Indians of the Northwest: “We call upon the Earth to teach us and show us the way.”

When Designing Space Moves Outside | Jane Parkins | Architecture Source
Due to its incredible benefits, both physical and mental, the connection between interior and exterior architecture has increased in popularity.

Urban areas need better planning | Elly Burhaini Faizal | Jakarta Post
Poor urban planning and over population have become the main challenges for city administrations in their efforts to minimize fatalities in times of disasters, officials and experts have said.

REWRITING A CITY IN NATURE | Diana Balmori | Urban Design Review
“Our understanding of nature has changed radically. Our ideas about urbanism must catch up. By rewriting the city (a semantic departure from “planning”), we will jar the public to this major scientific and philosophical shift in the interaction of nature and the city.”

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IMAGE CREDIT: Flickr User:  Kristine Paulus

BIG ♥ NYC to celebrate Valentine’s Day

BIG ♥ NYC to celebrate Valentine's Day

Credit: Ho-Kyung-Lee

BIG + Times Square Alliance + Flatcut + Local Projects and Zumtobel celebrate the Valentine’s Day  with an interactive heart installation at Times Square, New York utilizing the flow of people, air and touch to bring the heart to life.
Continue reading BIG ♥ NYC to celebrate Valentine’s Day

A Walk in the Woods | Hillsdale New York | Jon Piasecki

A Walk in the Woods-Jon Piasecki

The goal of this project is to connect my clients, an urban family of 4, with the amazing rural land they own in upstate New York as their second home. Simplicity, ease of maintenance and the use of materials taken from the 90 acres are the guideposts that orient the project. This work is a sculptural examination of the subtle traces of cultural history and ecological processes on site.

The soil on the project is horrendous. It is a greasy mix of shale and clay that is prone both to drought and standing water depending on the ambient meteorological conditions. The deer pressure is intense with upwards of 40 deer per square mile. No irrigation system exists, nor can it as the well supplies very little water. The wind and cold conditions are extreme. This site was formerly a high pasture for cattle that had been left fallow as a result of its low productivity for a few decades before my clients bought this land. The clients are not avid gardeners. They are quite busy and they live on this site primarily on the weekends.
Continue reading A Walk in the Woods | Hillsdale New York | Jon Piasecki

studio a+i wins AIDS Memorial Park Design Competition

AIDS Memorial Park Design Competition
Organizers of New York City’s proposed AIDS Memorial Park  today announced the winners of their design competition. First place was awarded to Brooklyn, NY’s studio a+i: Mateo Paiva, Lily Lim, John Thurtle, Insook Kim, and Esteban Erlich, with a rendering by Guillaume Paturel, for their design “Infinite Forest.” The design was selected from 475 entries submitted between November 29, 2011 and January 21, 2012, representing more than 26 U.S. states and 32 countries on six continents.

Continue reading studio a+i wins AIDS Memorial Park Design Competition

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