This Week in Landscape | 12 August 2012

back from a hiatus here is the “This Week in Landscape” links from across the globe.

 The Green Team: Part 1 | Metropolis Magazine
Terrie Brightman and Lisa DuRussel along with others from Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects have started blogging  about landscape architecture at the Metropolis Magazine

Tree Massacre At Queens Borough Hall | Geoffrey Croft | A Walk In The Park
It was cheaper for a city to cut down trees and buy new trees than to move the existing trees – the epitome of waste and bureaucracy?

Q&A: Diana Balmori | Jared Green | Metropolis Magazine
“There will be no remedy but to put the architecture and landscape together. Both architects and landscape architects are starting to work in ways that imitate nature in the way that it functions.” Diana Balmori

John Magee’s Native Landscape Designs Create Habitat for Wildlife | Al Bredenberg | Inhabitat
“Even as habitat becomes more and more disrupted by development, we’re creating more and more little islands of habitat. Wildlife can move and migrate from one to another of them.”

An Architect’s Vision: Bare Elegance in China | Jane Perlez | New York Times
“I love Manhattan. It’s a very interesting place. But if you want to copy something that was accomplished in 200 years, it’s very difficult. New York was not designed by architects, it was designed by time.”

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AIDS Memorial new design approved by Community Board

New York City AIDS Memorial new design approved by community board
The New York City AIDS Memorial organization recently announced that Community Board 2 has voted in favor of the new design for a memorial. The memorial will honor the 100,000+ New York City residents lost to AIDS and recognize the ongoing epidemic.

Continue reading AIDS Memorial new design approved by Community Board

West Point Foundry Preserve breaks ground

West Point Foundry Preserve breaks ground

Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects has broken ground on a $3.6M project to preserve and interpret the historic ruins of the West Point Foundry Preserve in the Village of Cold Spring, New York, transforming the venerable site into a park that respects and reveals its industrial and ecological history. Scenic Hudson, the largest environmental group focused on protecting and restoring the Hudson Valley, owns the preserve and commissioned Mathews Nielsen for the project, which is supported in part by a Preserve America grant.
West Point Foundry Preserve breaks ground
Continue reading West Point Foundry Preserve breaks ground

NYC breaks ground on new Governors Island Park

NYC breaks ground on new Governors Island Park
The Shell at Liberty Terrace

Recently, New York City officials broke ground on Phase 1 of the new Governors Island Park, with over 30 acres including Liggett Terrace, a six acre plaza with seasonal plantings, seating, water features and public art; Hammock Grove, a ten acre space that is home to 2,000 new trees, play areas and hammocks; and the Play Lawn, 14 acres for play and relaxation that includes two turf ball fields sized for adult softball and Little League baseball. Also to be built will be welcome areas, a re-graded Parade Ground and key visitor amenities, including lighting, seating and signage throughout the Historic District.

Continue reading NYC breaks ground on new Governors Island Park

Newport Green | Newport USA | Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects

Newport Green | Newport USA Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects

Newport Green, a park comprising a 4.25-acre waterfront site at the north end of Newport, New Jersey, is now open to the public. Located in a large, mixed use community across from lower Manhattan, the park provides comprehensive amenities requested by local residents not available in other area spaces. The first phase of the park, comprising an all-weather play field, playground, display and native gardens.

Continue reading Newport Green | Newport USA | Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects

This Week in Landscape | 29 April 2012

This weeks round-up of landscape news from around the web.

On an Urban Heat Island, Zippy Red Oaks | Douglas Main | NY Times
Red oak seedlings in Central Park grow up to eight times faster than their cousins cultivated outside the city, probably because of the urban “heat island” effect…

Michigan prepares to deregulate occupations | Jack Lessenberry | The Windsor Star
After regulating the landscape architecture profession back in 2010, Michigan is looking to deregulate landscape architecture in 2012.

The Landscapes of Region 11′s Built System | Urban Omnibus
A interview with Jim Lau about the recent projects by NYDOT in Region 11

Star architects unveil wild plans for Union Station circa 2050 |  Christopher Hawthorne | LA Times
LA Times architecture critic  Christopher Hawthorne gives a brief summary on the visions for Union Station presented by architects seeking to win the project.

Turning Unused Acres Green | John Leland | NY Times
Looking at how 596 Acres is changing Brooklyn’s unused land.

Send us your links during the week to contribute@worldlandscapearchitect.com

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This Week in Landscape | 15 April 2012

This weeks round-up of landscape news from around the web.

Why Designers Need To Stop Feeling Sorry For Africa | Skibsted Ideation | Fast Co Design
Taking a patronizing approach to investing in Africa undermines the continent’s people and entrepreneurial promise, argues Jens Martin Skibsted and Rasmus Bech Hansen.

How green is a parking lot? New efforts to test infrastructure | David J. Unger | Sacremento Bee
A growing number of civil engineers, landscape architects and urban planners are making a case for not just repairing but also for greening the structural underbelly we rely on to drink our water, cross our rivers and park our cars.

NY state parks system getting $89M funding boost | Wall Street Journal
$89 million in New York Works capital projects for the state-run system of 178 parks and 35 historic sites.

Six new spots for architecture lovers | Katia Hetter | CNN
Various spots around the world including the High Line

A new approach to infrastructure | Denise Deveau | Calgary Herald

Canadian cities need to replace their aging infrastructure to accommodate new weather patterns, shifting demographics and social trends

The Shell Game | Martin C. Pedersen | Metropolis Magazine
New York University announced yesterday that it was scaling back its controversial plans for expansion

Send us your links during the week to contribute@worldlandscapearchitect.com

For more news during the week become a World Landscape Architecture fan on Facebook,  Join our LinkedIN group,  Follow us on Twitter @wlandscapearch or Weibo and then  Circle us on Google+

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