This Week in Landscape | 26 February 2012

This weeks round-up of landscape news and views from around the web

Fresh Kills Park | Flickr User Kristine Paulus

Big City Conservation: New York City’s Hidden Biodiversity | Molly Marquand | Ecology.com
“Where every great city stands today, a natural ecosystem once thrived. London was built on a floodplain of the River Thames; New York was set up on great tracts of oak woodland; and Tokyo, the most populous metropolis in the world, once supported a lush and verdant subtropical forest.”

Vietnam memorial designer says the Earth has lessons to teach us | John Conti | Pittsburgh Tribune-Review
Lin perhaps summed up her work best herself when she quoted a prayer attributed to the Chinook Indians of the Northwest: “We call upon the Earth to teach us and show us the way.”

When Designing Space Moves Outside | Jane Parkins | Architecture Source
Due to its incredible benefits, both physical and mental, the connection between interior and exterior architecture has increased in popularity.

Urban areas need better planning | Elly Burhaini Faizal | Jakarta Post
Poor urban planning and over population have become the main challenges for city administrations in their efforts to minimize fatalities in times of disasters, officials and experts have said.

REWRITING A CITY IN NATURE | Diana Balmori | Urban Design Review
“Our understanding of nature has changed radically. Our ideas about urbanism must catch up. By rewriting the city (a semantic departure from “planning”), we will jar the public to this major scientific and philosophical shift in the interaction of nature and the city.”

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IMAGE CREDIT: Flickr User:  Kristine Paulus

A Walk in the Woods | Hillsdale New York | Jon Piasecki

A Walk in the Woods-Jon Piasecki

The goal of this project is to connect my clients, an urban family of 4, with the amazing rural land they own in upstate New York as their second home. Simplicity, ease of maintenance and the use of materials taken from the 90 acres are the guideposts that orient the project. This work is a sculptural examination of the subtle traces of cultural history and ecological processes on site.

The soil on the project is horrendous. It is a greasy mix of shale and clay that is prone both to drought and standing water depending on the ambient meteorological conditions. The deer pressure is intense with upwards of 40 deer per square mile. No irrigation system exists, nor can it as the well supplies very little water. The wind and cold conditions are extreme. This site was formerly a high pasture for cattle that had been left fallow as a result of its low productivity for a few decades before my clients bought this land. The clients are not avid gardeners. They are quite busy and they live on this site primarily on the weekends.
Continue reading A Walk in the Woods | Hillsdale New York | Jon Piasecki

studio a+i wins AIDS Memorial Park Design Competition

AIDS Memorial Park Design Competition
Organizers of New York City’s proposed AIDS Memorial Park  today announced the winners of their design competition. First place was awarded to Brooklyn, NY’s studio a+i: Mateo Paiva, Lily Lim, John Thurtle, Insook Kim, and Esteban Erlich, with a rendering by Guillaume Paturel, for their design “Infinite Forest.” The design was selected from 475 entries submitted between November 29, 2011 and January 21, 2012, representing more than 26 U.S. states and 32 countries on six continents.

Continue reading studio a+i wins AIDS Memorial Park Design Competition

This Week in Landscape | 29 January 2012

This weeks round-up of landscape news and views from around the web

Times and Tides Weigh on Hudson River Park (Hudson River Park Faces New Challenges) | CHARLES V. BAGLI and LISA W. FODERARO | New York Times
Hudson River Park stretches along the Manhattan waterfront from Battery Place to 59th Street and has changed the West Side of Manhattan by drawing development money into the area. Funding is starting to dry up as the recession has bitten hard into the city coffers just when the money is needed to develop the revenue raising commercial piers.

North Grant Park plans offer reasons for excitement, concern | Blair Kamin | Chicago Tribune
Kamin looks into what happened to plans for the Children’s Museum and the implications of the new design for the park by Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates.

You’ve Heard About Slow Food. What We Really Need Is Slow Design | MICHAEL BARDIN | Fast Company Design
Micheal Bardin of PERKINS+WILL looks at why now is the time to change the way we heat and cool buildings.

Architecture that re-imagines the world | CNN
Bjarke Ingels is creative and passionate about architecture on CNN.

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2012 Land Art Generator Initiative international design competition opens

2012 Land Art Generator Initiative international design competition

Freshkills Park (Flickr: gsz)

Land Art Generator Initiative announces $20,000 in prize money for the competition open until July 1, 2012. The open call asks for large-scale artwork proposals for Freshkills Park that generate utility-scale renewable electricity for New York City.
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