This Week In Landscape | 3 March 2013

This Week In Landscape | 3 March 2013

Vancouver | Coal Harbour | Flickr User alans1948

Landscape links from around the world during the week of 25 February to 3 March 2013

Landscape Performance Research: The Economics of Change | Jason Twill, LEED AP and Stuart Cowan, PhD | Landscape Architecture Foundation
The overarching goal of The Economics of Change is to shift mainstream real estate practices to document the full value of a built environment that is compatible with healthy, natural systems.

The Most Important Urban Design Decision Vancouver Ever Made? | Brent Toderian | Huffington Post
“In 1997, the city approved its first transformative Transportation Plan. Co-written through a first-time (and not easy) partnership between city planners and transportation engineers, the plan was a game-changer for our city-making model in many ways….”

The Green Team Part 10: POPS for the People…and the Developer | Zeina Zahalan | Metropolis Magazine
“The primary goal of POPS is to unite function with aesthetics—to create public spaces that provide respite in the city’s dense urban fabric.”

Urbanization of the People Must Follow That of the Land | Lan Fang | Caixin
The core of urbanization lies not only in large-scale city building and expansion of industrial parks, but also in the great migration of people from farm villages into cities.

Pedestrian Friendly Streetscape in Santa Cruz | William Langston | A Landscape Architect and a Passport
“So when we were in Puerto Ayora, Santa Cruz Island I was immediately taken by the impressive streetscape improvements to the main streets in town.”

Sequestration Frustration, Close to Home | OLIN Blog
“Clearly the politics of this question run deep, and as advocates of the urban public realm, we can’t hope to remain unbiased. But maybe if we, as advocates and citizens, can join the conversation, we can encourage the power players in Washington to start talking as well.”

A Blog’s Adieu | New York Times
Sadly, the New York Times Green blog has been shutdown to focus on other areas.

IMAGE CREDIT | Flickr User alans1948

STUDENT PROJECT | The Solar Baths at Freshkills Park | Ian Mackay & Steve Muza

STUDENT PROJECT | The Solar Baths at Freshkills Park | Ian Mackay & Steve Muza

On the southern face of the Freshkills landfill’s North mound, four large ponds of salt water capture and store heat radiating from both the sun and the landfill. Each pond is coupled with a tall solar chimney that extracts the heat and converts it to electricity. Multiple smaller salt ponds utilize the same heat to create an artificial hot springs for New York: The Solar Baths at Freshkills Park. The entire system is driven by the concept of the heat-cascade: the multi-stage reuse of residual thermal energy by temperature level. It aims to make that concept tangible to New Yorkers by inviting them to bathe in the heat of their own trash.

Continue reading STUDENT PROJECT | The Solar Baths at Freshkills Park | Ian Mackay & Steve Muza

Storm Surge Defense Alternatives | Catherine Seavitt Nordenson

Storm Surge Defense Alternatives proposed by CCNY Professor

Catherine Seavitt Nordenson says environmentally friendly ‘soft infrastructure’ mitigates flood damage without sending harm elsewhere. The flooding caused by Superstorm Sandy prompted calls from New York State Gov. Andrew Cuomo and other officials to consider building storm surge barriers to protect Lower Manhattan from future catastrophes. But, such a strategy could make things even worse for outlying areas that were hit hard by the hurricane, City College of New York Associate Professor of Landscape Architecture Catherine Seavitt Nordenson warns.

Continue reading Storm Surge Defense Alternatives | Catherine Seavitt Nordenson

This Week in Landscape | 18 November 2012

Landscape Links from around the world

 Urban Sustainability Enhanced Through Landscape Architecture | Thomas R. Tavella, FASLA | Living Green Magazine
This article explores ways that landscape architectures are not only “greening” up properties in the more literal sense, but “greening” them up through the implementation of sustainable technologies and approaches.

Garden design: it’s not just about the plants | Amanda Patton | The Guardian
Pretty flowers there may be, but making a three-dimensional space that is both practical and beautiful is about so much more

Hidden, Until the Storm’s Whirl and Splash | New York Times
Hurricane Sandy knocked down a wall facade South Street in Lower Manhattan, exposing, among other things, a time capsule of 1970s graffiti.

“Architects in China are Lost” – Neri&Hu | Dezeen
Chinese architects need to develop their own design manifesto to stem the tide of “half-assed” building projects in the country, according to Lyndon Neri and Rossana Hu of Shanghai studio Neri&Hu.

10 Diagrams that changed city planning | Dwell

Facebook launches Job App
The new SJP app is a central location where recruiters can share open positions with the Facebook community sorted by industry, location and skills.

 

Imagining the Lowline exhibit opens

Imagining the Lowline exhibit opens
Last Saturday the “Imagining the Lowline” exhibit opened to the public as part of the “Experiments in Motion” initiative commissioned by Audi of America and in partnership with the Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation (GSAPP), nine student visions will be presented along with a 45-foot-long suspended model of Manhattan’s subway grid that contextualizes the Lowline within the city’s huge inventory of underground spaces.

Continue reading Imagining the Lowline exhibit opens

This Week In Landscape | 16 September 2012


Another week of landscape links from around the world
The Big Task of Managing Nature at New York’s Central Park | Charles A. Birnbaum | The Cultural Landscape Foundation
“Central Park faces unprecedented use, along with changing climatic conditions and an onslaught of severe weather events. Additionally, increasing knowledge and proven notions about ecological restoration have added a new dimension to this century-and-a-half long conversation about how we interact with our environment and manage our idealized version of nature.”

Green walls ‘need building code’ to reduce fire hazard
“A SYDNEY landscape architect is pushing for green walls to be regulated under building and fire safety codes after he recently saw one go up in flames at a local bar.”

Urban Forestry for Symbolizing Eco-City | Md. Zahidur Rahman and Saeed Ahmed Siddiquee | Blitz
“Currently, unplanned urbanization resulted ecological imbalances in the city. FAO (2008) pointed out that Dhaka city has 21.57% open space where city parks belong to 0.89% and 0.02% for urban forest, garden for 0.90% and 12.12% for agriculture to meets the ecological balance of the city dwellers.”

African Ministers Adopt Programmes to Boost Sustainable Development, Eye Key Role in Post-Rio+20 Landscape | UNEP

What architects do doesn’t count | Jody Brown | Coffee with an Architect
“Because we don’t design the destination. We design the path.”

Fire-Resistant Plant List for the California Supplemental Exam | CSE for Landscape Architects
“These plants will eventually burn if the fire conditions are hot and dry enough, but they resist ignition better than many other species.”

Exploring the Upper West Side’s Riverside Park South | Curbed NY
“Riverside Park South offers up one of the Manhattan’s best opportunities to consider the city’s past as an industrial hub while considering the future of its waterfront. ”

IMAGE CREDIT: Flickr User Ed Yourdon

2012 LAGI NYC Competition submissions now online

2012 LAGI NYC Submissions go online

Heliofield | Michael Chaveriat, Yikyu Choe, Myung Kweon Park

Over 250 submissions have gone online for the  LAGI NYC 2012 competition to design public artwork for Freshkills Park. Some submissions go from the surreal to the amazing, with the majority of the submissions creating large scale installations to match the grand scale of the Freshkills Park. In July LAGI held a shortlisting evening in which a team of professionals got the submissions down to the top 25 submissions with the winners of the 2012 competition to be announced on October 25 in New York City. We has some of the submissions below for your review.

Heliofield
Heliofield is an energy-generating network of solar modules that rise out of the prairie grasses of Fresh Kills Park. The topography and tabula rasa quality of the former landfill site make it ideally suited to collect the locally abundant and renewable solar energy that shines on Staten Island.

Continue reading 2012 LAGI NYC Competition submissions now online

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