This Week in Landscape | 13 January 2013

Another week of landscape links from around the world

L.A. River: From Eyesore to Opportunity | WSJ VIDEO (4mins29s)
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is conducting a study to find ways to restore habitats in and around the Los Angeles River, bringing people and wildlife back to the city’s original source of life

How Google Earth Revealed Chicago’s Hidden Farms | Sarah Zielinski | NPR
“Urban agriculture is sometimes thought of as something new and trendy, but of course people have been growing food in backyards and on vacant land for generations,” Taylor says.

Reviving Europe’s Biodiversity By Importing Exotic Animals | Christian Schwägerl | Yale Environment 360
“Scientists are conducting intriguing — and counterintuitive — experiments at several sites in Germany: Bringing back long-lost herbivores, such as water buffalo, to encourage the spread of native plants that have fared poorly in Europe’s human-dominated landscape.”

NYC is turning 12,000 old parking meters into bike racks | Tyler Falk | Smart Planet
The city’s department of transportation has signed a $2 million contract to turn 12,000 old parking meter poles into bike racks.

Why Floor and Brown Left SmithGroupJJR | Daniel Jost | Landscape Architecture Magazine
An interview with Kristina Floor, FASLA and Chris Brown, FASLA, about leaving SmithGroupJJR after merging 4 years ago.

Winter 2013 Landscape Architecture Walks: Samuel Smith Park- Artificial Ice Trail | OALA
The OALA Social Committee is inviting members join them on Saturday 19 January to a Walk of the award winning Samuel Smith Park- Artificial Ice Trail project (In Toronto) lead by Jim Melvin from PMA Landscape Architects.

Meeting the Northwest Livability Challenge | University of Oregon
School of Architecture and Allied Arts is holding a panel discussion in Portland on Wednesday, January 16.

Tokachi Millennium Forest | Shimizu Japan | Dan Pearson Studio

Tokachi Millennium Forest |  Shimizu Japan | Dan Pearson Studio
The 240 hectare Tokachi Millennium Forest is the brainchild of the entrepreneur Mitsushige Hayashi, who acquired the land with a view to offsetting the carbon footprint of his national newspaper business, Tokachi Mainichi. The masterplan, which I contributed to with the local Japanese landscape designer Fumiaki Takano, is marketed as having a sustainable vision of a thousand years, and this big thinking aims to not only to make the newspaper business carbon neutral, but also to preserve and prevent the further loss of natural habitats on the island to development. Hayashi believes that, in order for this vision to be viable, education is key. Helping it’s users to take ownership of the park is the best way to ensure it’s future.
Continue reading Tokachi Millennium Forest | Shimizu Japan | Dan Pearson Studio

Seeds of Change | Bristol UK | Gitta Gschwendtner & Maria Thereza Alves

Seeds of Change | Bristol UK | Gitta Gschwendtner & Maria Thereza Alves

‘Seeds of Change’ is a floating garden; the result of a collaboration between the designer Gitta Gschwendtner and the artist Maria Thereza Alves. The title ‘Seeds of Change’ stems from an ongoing ballast seed garden project from Brazillian artist Maria Thereza Alves. Between 1680 and the early 1900′s ships’ ballast – earth, stones and gravel from trade boats from all over the world used to weigh down the vessel as it docked- was offloaded into the river at Bristol. This ballast contained the seeds of plants from wherever the ship had sailed.

Continue reading Seeds of Change | Bristol UK | Gitta Gschwendtner & Maria Thereza Alves

This Week in Landscape | 21 October 2012

Landscape links from around the world for your weekly reading

Las Vegas Downtown | Image posted by Flickr User Fronteras Desk Image taken by Jude Joffe-Block

What Happens in Brooklyn Moves to Vegas | Timothy Pratt | NY Times
…almost a year into the Downtown Project, his $350 million urban experiment to build “the most community-focused large city in the world” in downtown Las Vegas

Appreciating the D.C. area’s landscapes | Roger K. Lewis | The Washington Post
To help local citizens and millions of annual visitors explore, understand and better appreciate the city’s landscapes, and not just its buildings, the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) recently launched its “Landscape Architect’s Guide to Washington, D.C.”

Native plants support native animal populations | Candy Williams | triblive
Native plants offer many other advantages, according to Castorani. They are adapted to our soils and climate, they require less care and watering when established, and they thrive with less fertilizer and disease control.

German Gardener Helps Saudi Desert Bloom | Susanne Koelbl | Spiegel Online
A German landscape architect who has been working in Saudi Arabia for nearly 40 years, Richard Bödeker turns his wealthy clients’ dreams into reality.

Cities need to think of green urban solutions | Construction & Maintenance News 
The participants comprised 90 newly qualified landscape architects, leading international architects, engineers and experts, how the increasing amount of rainwater may affect future urban design and help create ownership and new cultural attitudes to water in cities.

 Where will we live? | Arif Hasan | Himal Magazine
Arif Hasan speaks on the ‘World-Class City’ concept, and its repercussions on urban planning for Asian cities.

Infographic: An App For Architects That Makes Physics Easy | Fast Co Design 
The app, available for iPhone and iPad, is a barebones set of images and animations that show the forces inherent in cables, arches, domes, columns, beams, and more.

 

IMAGE CREDIT | Image posted by Flickr User Fronteras Desk Image taken by Jude Joffe-Block

Tiburon Bay House | Tiburon USA | Shades of Green Landscape Architecture

Intent: The client wanted a garden with different outdoor spaces so there would be places to enjoy the view, but also have areas that were shielded from the wind. The lot is steep and fairly large, so large areas were to be natural and low maintenance.  We also wanted to reuse the materials on the site; to minimize and reuse water; and to keep surfaces permeable while creating a natural and modern garden.

Continue reading Tiburon Bay House | Tiburon USA | Shades of Green Landscape Architecture

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