Why not in the garden? pop-up at Expo Gate Milano by A4A Rivolta Savioni studio

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Why not in the garden? is a short-term, mobile and changeable, accessible and versatile pop-up. It is a public garden on wheels and, started from dawn on Monday 13th April, with a stage performance, plants and flowers were added throughout the morning.

The Why not in the garden? design.
What makes this installation different is green on wheels, a module in two versions. The vertical element is a light iron structure painted in bright colours with wooden benches and espaliers for the pots of plants, while the horizontal element is a an iron platform-flower bed. The modules are all mounted on bicycle tires painted the same colours as the structure which holds aromatic, garden and flowering plants. The artwork on the flooring traces the different layouts of Why not in the garden? during the time it will be at the Expo Gate, showing what will be happening there. A 40-metre-long cardboard table will run the length of the square for the late-night spaghetti party on Thursday 16 April.

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Lunch on the 40metre long table at Expo Gate on 15 April 2015

 

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A pop-up field in the centre of Milan by A4A Rivolta Savioni Architetti

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Over 1,500 man-sized sheaves of corn for the field that shot up overnight at the end of July, in the heart of Milan, opposite the Sforza Castle, between the two Expo Gate pavilions. “quantomais”, the project devised and produced by A4A Rivolta Savioni Architetti, on an invitation from Expo Gate’s artistic curator Caroline Corbetta, will be part of the city for the entire month of August.

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Bosco Verticale/Vertical Forest | Milan Italy | Boeri Studio

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Image Credit | Barreca & LaVarra

The Vertical Forest project aims to build high-density tower blocks with trees within the city. The first example of a Vertical Forest is currently under construction in Milan in Porta Nuova Isola area, part of a larger redevelopment project developed by Hines Italia with two towers which are 80 metres and 112 metres tall respectively, and which will be able to hold 480 big and medium size trees, 250 small size trees, 11.000 groundcover plants and 5.000 shrubs (the equivalent of a hectare of forest).

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Piazza Gae Aulenti | Milan Italy | AECOM

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A new piazza in the heart of Milan named after Gae Aulenti, the late Italian architect of the Musée d’Orsay in Paris, and sits at the heart of the Porta Nuova Garibaldi development adjacent to Milan’s main train station. AECOM, winning the project as EDAW, architect César Pelli and Italian landscape designers Land have together provided a stunning new gateway to one of Europe’s most stylish cities. Linked to Milan’s main public transport hub (Garibaldi Railway station), the square is a key part of one of Italy’s largest regeneration projects.
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Gustafson Porter wins CityLife Park International Design Competition

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Leading international landscape architects Gustafson Porter (London) have won the competition to design the Milan CityLife Park with their concept CityLife ‒ A Park between the Mountains and the Plain. The Mayor of Milan, Letizia Moratti, announced the winning design of the international competition to create a public park in the centre of Milan. Gustafson Porter’s concept builds on Milan’s commanding position between the rich agricultural plains of the Po to the south and the routes across the Alps to the rest of Europe to the north – resulting in its role as a major European trading centre throughout history.

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