This Week In Landscape | 3 March 2013

This Week In Landscape | 3 March 2013

Vancouver | Coal Harbour | Flickr User alans1948

Landscape links from around the world during the week of 25 February to 3 March 2013

Landscape Performance Research: The Economics of Change | Jason Twill, LEED AP and Stuart Cowan, PhD | Landscape Architecture Foundation
The overarching goal of The Economics of Change is to shift mainstream real estate practices to document the full value of a built environment that is compatible with healthy, natural systems.

The Most Important Urban Design Decision Vancouver Ever Made? | Brent Toderian | Huffington Post
“In 1997, the city approved its first transformative Transportation Plan. Co-written through a first-time (and not easy) partnership between city planners and transportation engineers, the plan was a game-changer for our city-making model in many ways….”

The Green Team Part 10: POPS for the People…and the Developer | Zeina Zahalan | Metropolis Magazine
“The primary goal of POPS is to unite function with aesthetics—to create public spaces that provide respite in the city’s dense urban fabric.”

Urbanization of the People Must Follow That of the Land | Lan Fang | Caixin
The core of urbanization lies not only in large-scale city building and expansion of industrial parks, but also in the great migration of people from farm villages into cities.

Pedestrian Friendly Streetscape in Santa Cruz | William Langston | A Landscape Architect and a Passport
“So when we were in Puerto Ayora, Santa Cruz Island I was immediately taken by the impressive streetscape improvements to the main streets in town.”

Sequestration Frustration, Close to Home | OLIN Blog
“Clearly the politics of this question run deep, and as advocates of the urban public realm, we can’t hope to remain unbiased. But maybe if we, as advocates and citizens, can join the conversation, we can encourage the power players in Washington to start talking as well.”

A Blog’s Adieu | New York Times
Sadly, the New York Times Green blog has been shutdown to focus on other areas.

IMAGE CREDIT | Flickr User alans1948

This Week In Landscape | 24 February 2013

Gorse over looking Edinburgh (2012) | Image Credit Flickr user somekindofrob

This week’s Landscape Links from around the world…………

To Control Floods, The Dutch Turn to Nature for Inspiration | Cheryl Katz | Yale e360
The Sand Engine is the signature project of Building with Nature, a consortium of Dutch industries, universities, research institutes, and public water agencies looking to harness natural systems for next-generation hydraulic engineering.

Conservationists hope to turn a disused Paris railway line into a nature trail | Sophie Landrin | Guardian
“So what should Paris do with this secret hideaway? Leave it to run wild, or turn it into a park? The city council has launched a consultation process involving residents and neighbourhood groups, the aim being to take a decision at the end of the year.”

National Parks on a Precipice | Leslie Macmillian | NY Times
“Unless Congress can reach a budget agreement by March 1, the country’s national parks will be hit by a $110 million budget cut, resulting in shuttered camp grounds, shorter seasons, road closings….”

From Denial to Integrated Solutions | Steven Apfelbaum | Metropolis Magazine
“If Sandy has taught us anything, it is that nature will always have the last word—a word that can seem unpredictable from our time-limited perspective. Nature takes the long view, repeatedly adapting to changes.”

2013 CSI Research Fellows Announced | Landscape Architecture Foundation
“Eight faculty Research Fellows have been selected for LAF’s 2013 Case Study Investigation (CSI) program. CSI is a unique research collaboration that matches LAF-funded faculty and student research teams with design firms to document the benefits of exemplary high-performing landscape projects as Landscape Performance Series Case Study Briefs.”

Plantwatch: ‘When gorse is out of bloom, kissing is out of season’ | Paul Simons | Guardian
“Gorse flowers are at their best around this time of year although they stay in flower most of the year, hence the saying “When gorse is out of bloom, kissing is out of season”.”

Living in Lafayette Park | Danielle Aubert, Lana Cavar, and Natasha Chandani | Metropolis Magazine
“The various views are all interesting and they’re all different. It’s surprising how the view of the Meadow from my neighbor’s house just three doors down is quite different from mine.”

Paint Is Not Enough | Erik Griswold | Copenhagenize.com
“Physical separation using traffic islands or raised aprons or recessed curbing as seen in places like Long Beach, California or Missoula, (yes, Missoula!) Montana or Richmond, British Columbia show what is already in use in North America.”

Image Credit | Flickr user somekindofrob

 

This Week in Landscape | 10 February 2013

Landscape links from around the world this week…

Landscape of professionalism | Brent Bellamy | Winnipeg Free Press
“Landscape architects work as part of a design team to ensure buildings appropriately engage the public realm, strengthening their connection to the human scale.”

The Green Team Part 9: Going Vertical | Terrie Brightman | Metropolis Magazine
The design of exterior vertical surfaces can take on many forms and configurations including green screens, green walls, cable trellis systems, wall-mounted planters, trellises, and planters housing fastigiate (columnar) species, to name a few.

The Great Exchange | Daniel Jost | Landscape Architecture Magazine
“Professors from both sides of the Pacific talk about the amazing cultural exchange happening between American and Chinese universities and the rising stature of landscape architecture in China.”

10 Best Cities for Urban Forests | American Forests
“These cities stood out among the 50 most populous cities in the nation based on a combination of six main criteria….”

Imagining a Drone-Proof City | Sarah Goodyear | Atlantic Cities
“The City hides the individual in the embrace of the community, using human traits drones cannot understand as protection. The City subverts the aggressor.”

IMAGE CREDIT | Flickr user fiat.luxury

This Week in Landscape | 20 January 2013

This Week’s landscape links

The Green Team Part 7: From Field to Park | Lisa DuRussel | Metropolis Magazine
“The landscape architect’s job doesn’t end when she leaves the nursery. The trees we’ve selected must be maintained, cared for, and prepped in anticipation of delivering them to the project for installation. ”

The 1934 Plan to Fill In the Hudson River for $1 Billion | Jessica Dailey | Curbed
“In 1934, an engineer named Norman Sper proposed filling in the Hudson River to create an additional ten square miles for city development.”

Peavey Plaza Now Registered As Historic Place | CBS Minnesota
Downtown Minneapolis’ Peavey Plaza has been listed in the National Register of Historic Places, The Cultural Landscape Foundation (TCLF) announced Thursday.

Reuse and the Cultural Landscape | Vince Michael | Time tells
“In a real sense, the challenge is to fine-tune our approaches so that we can find new markets, new functions, new value in both elements of a cultural landscape: the tangible and the intangible.”

Guide To Integrate Green Infrastructure Into Stormwater Permits | Jeffrey Odefey | American Rivers
“Polluted runoff remains a significant source of pollution largely because the permits that regulate it are based on a poorly defined and highly discretionary standard that calls for measures that reduce stormwater “to the maximum extent practicable.” ”

Who’s on First? Unlocking the potential of dispersed teams | Maria Manion, Rachel Casanova, & Roshelle Ritzenthaler | ideas+buildings
7 points that Perkins+Will have shared their best practices with a growing population of remote teams

This Week in Landscape | 2 December 2012

this weeks landscape links from around the world

The Green Team Part 5: Tree Tag…You’re It! | Lisa DuRussel | Metropolis Magazine
….there comes a time when a landscape architect moves out from behind her drawing set, turns off AutoCAD, and heads out to a nursery.

New York City AIDS Memorial Approved by Landmarks | Jeremiah Budin | Curbed NY
..The future New York City AIDS Memorial at St. Vincent’s Hospital Park, the agreed upon design from Studio a + i received no opposition from the Landmarks Preservation Commission….

Do Landscape Architects Need to Open Up the Conversation? | Darryl Jones| DIRT
Howe wrapped things up with, “this is a navel we have been picking for generations.” Sensing some unrest from the mostly young audience, Hough declared, “we are the status quo,” referring to himself and the other panelists, “it’s up to you to change the conversation.”

Removal of design from school curriculum is “insanity” – Neville Brody | Dezeen
The creative industries need high-quality creative graduates. If we’re not getting the graduates, we’re not going to sustain the industry,” said Brody.

US coastal cities in danger as sea levels rise faster than expected, study warns | Grantham Research Institute and Duncan Clark | Guardian
Sea-level rise is occurring much faster than scientists expected – exposing millions more Americans to the destructive floods produced by future Sandy-like storms, new research suggests.

1 2 3
RSS FEED EMAIL SUBSCRIPTION Follow Us on Twitter Join Our LinkedIN Group Become a Fan on Facebook Circle us on google+

CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS

MAGAZINE SPECIAL EDITIONS