This Week in Landscape | 19 January 2014

ice_storm_cleanup
After ice storm exacts unprecedented damage to Toronto’s urban forest, question remains on what to do with the broken trees | Peter Kuitenbrouwer | National Post
“Never in Toronto’s history has a storm exacted such a toll on our forest. Still, does it make sense to grind all these trees up for mulch? Many in the city’s forestry sector, which employs 25,000 people, are pleading for a more creative approach to reusing one of Canada’s most famous and historic resources: our trees.”

How Weʼve Abandoned Dan Kiley | Tom Bamberger | urban milwaukee
“Why isn’t the grass of a master landscape designer given the same care as an above average suburban lawn? Plunking the Lake Festival of Arts on top of the Kiley every June has something to do with it. In September tents were set up for some other festival.”

World’s smallest water lily stolen from Kew Gardens | Guardian
“A Nymphaea thermarum, the smallest water lily in the world and extinct in the wild, is believed to have been stolen between 8.30am and 2.55pm last Thursday at the Princess of Wales Conservatory ”

Could prison gardening schemes be the key to rehabilitation? | Emma Inglis | The Telegraph
“The gardens at Dartmoor prison are the exemplar of a successful horticultural rehabilitation project. In 2006, prison officer Ivan Judd had an idea to transform the disused exercise yards of the old punishment unit into vegetable gardens to be tended by inmates in the resettlement wing.”

Blogging Praxis/Practice | Praxis in Landscape Architecture
“This winter and spring, I will be posting a series on two projects I’m working on – a public health/neighborhood environment survey that I am very excited about and a studio class that I am teaching.”

Continue reading This Week in Landscape | 19 January 2014

This Week In Landscape | 16 September 2012


Another week of landscape links from around the world
The Big Task of Managing Nature at New York’s Central Park | Charles A. Birnbaum | The Cultural Landscape Foundation
“Central Park faces unprecedented use, along with changing climatic conditions and an onslaught of severe weather events. Additionally, increasing knowledge and proven notions about ecological restoration have added a new dimension to this century-and-a-half long conversation about how we interact with our environment and manage our idealized version of nature.”

Green walls ‘need building code’ to reduce fire hazard
“A SYDNEY landscape architect is pushing for green walls to be regulated under building and fire safety codes after he recently saw one go up in flames at a local bar.”

Urban Forestry for Symbolizing Eco-City | Md. Zahidur Rahman and Saeed Ahmed Siddiquee | Blitz
“Currently, unplanned urbanization resulted ecological imbalances in the city. FAO (2008) pointed out that Dhaka city has 21.57% open space where city parks belong to 0.89% and 0.02% for urban forest, garden for 0.90% and 12.12% for agriculture to meets the ecological balance of the city dwellers.”

African Ministers Adopt Programmes to Boost Sustainable Development, Eye Key Role in Post-Rio+20 Landscape | UNEP

What architects do doesn’t count | Jody Brown | Coffee with an Architect
“Because we don’t design the destination. We design the path.”

Fire-Resistant Plant List for the California Supplemental Exam | CSE for Landscape Architects
“These plants will eventually burn if the fire conditions are hot and dry enough, but they resist ignition better than many other species.”

Exploring the Upper West Side’s Riverside Park South | Curbed NY
“Riverside Park South offers up one of the Manhattan’s best opportunities to consider the city’s past as an industrial hub while considering the future of its waterfront. ”

IMAGE CREDIT: Flickr User Ed Yourdon

This Week in Landscape | 22 January 2012

This weeks round-up of landscape news and views from around the web

The design at the centre of Tim Waterman discussion: 'Snail and Snake Mound' Garden of Cosmic Speculation (Image Credit: Flickr user yellowbook)

Bad role models for landscape architecture | Tim Waterman | Landscape Institute
In the first of a six part series exploring how bad design concepts can get projects off to a false start, Tim Waterman explores the shortcomings of the ‘Inflexible Abstraction’.

Nature as Infrastructure | Ethel Baraona Pohl | Domus
An architecture report from Haerbin City by Ethel Baraona Pohl about how Turenscape’s founder Kongjian Yu demonstrates how nature can be a cost-free service provider in an urban context. Ecology is a synonym of economy.

Olmsted’s jewels in our midst | Justin Martin | Star Tribune
Few people can claim to know America as deeply as Frederick Law Olmsted did. His intimate knowledge of the American landscape served him superbly in the role for which he is best remembered — the country’s pioneering park maker.

San Francisco’s plan to cut non-native trees sparks environmental clash | Susan Sward | The Sacramento Bee
An intense battle is building over a little-known plan to cut down thousands of eucalyptus and other trees in urban forests here and at a city-owned golf course in Pacifica.

Critics fear loss of green spaces in regional development plan | Monique Beaudin | Montreal Gazette
West Island residents who worry that a new regional development plan will force them to allow construction on green spaces

Image Credit: Flickr user yellowbook

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This Week in Landscape | 8 January 2012

This Week in Landscape – A Weekly roundup of landscape news and stories from around the world.

Mall of America Carpark (c) Google

Paved, but Still Alive(Taking parking lots seriously as public-spaces) | Michael Kimmelman | New York Times
There are millions if not billions of carspaces in the USA and there is an oversupply with many carspaces remaining empty and these public spaces remain hot black asphalt deserts throughout cities across the world. Michael gives us some examples of successful carpark designs. Read More

The Grid at 200: Lines That Shaped Manhattan | Michael Kimmelman | New York Times
A look back at the grid that made New York the city it is today defining architecture, landscape, spaces and the lives on millions over time. Read More…

Waste opportunity – Creative management of landfill and recycling can transform landscape and generate income | Sarah Murray | FT.com
What happens to your rubbish? Sarah tales a look at how organisations and people around the world are dealing with landfills and makes reference to the Freshkill Project. Read More

See the building from the Trees | Sarah Williams Goldhagen | New York Times

How can cognitive neuroscience influnce the way that architects, landscape architects, planners and engineers are designing? Why are architects using tree metaphors in their designs for buildings? Sarah looks at tree metaphors and how we look at the built environment. Read More….

Designing Water | Joseph G. Brin | Metropolis Magazine
An interesting article that touches on the various design solutions to Water Management within cities including Rain Gardens, Permeable pavement and others. Read More

Walk-up windows are good urbanism | Dan Malouff  | Greater Greater Washington
Sidewalks(Footpaths) are interesting concrete pedestrians route that connect destinations, often we walk doorway to doorway with the odd cafe spilling out onto the space. Walk-up windows are a way to break the monotony of street life. Dan looks at Georgetown and a couple of its walk-up windows. Read More….

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