This Week in Landscape | 11 March 2012

This weeks round-up of landscape news and views from around the web

Landscape architects shape city’s green spaces | Sharon Litwin | NOLA.com
“Today landscape architecture projects can range from those as modest as private garden designs to those addressing issues of such huge scale as coastal erosion or managing environmental disasters.”

New York’s High Line project should inspire Ann Arbor to create its own urban parks | Will Hathaway & Marc Ross | AnnArbor.com
“The level of interest here in Ann Arbor was palpable in the near capacity Michigan Theater audience. Ann Arborites were enthusiastic about this story of reclaiming underutilized space for use as an urban public park.”

With city’s help, fans of Tampa’s Kiley Garden aim for a comeback | Richard Danielson | Tampa Bay Times
The City Council will look for funds to help complete an ambitious restoration of (Dan)Kiley Garden, often forgotten by locals but admired internationally by landscape architects.

Landscape Optimism: An Interview with Chris Reed | Quilian Riano | Design Observer
An interview with Chris Reed from Stoss Landscape Urbanism

New Urbanism not as simple as once thought, expert says | Blake Aued | Online Athens
Blake reports some interesting  Andres Duany statements  “He now favors a compromise, ecological urbanism. Pave over creeks and get rid of expensive green building standards in very dense areas, he said, because people who live on top of each other are doing the environment a favor by taking up less space.”

“Extreme Beauty and Extreme Vulgarity”: Rem Koolhaas Shares His Thoughts on Japanese Metabolist Architecture | Janelle Zara | Artinfo
“I was friends already with some of them and therefore there was an issue of accessibility,” Koolhaas said. “I was particularly interested to look at the first non-western avant-garde. We are currently living in a situation where a lot of initiatives are no longer ours…”

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This Week in Landscape | 12 February 2012

This weeks round-up of landscape news and views from around the web

Tribeca Neighborhood has a High Walkability Score (Flickr Image: Paul Stein)

Most Americans Want a Walkable Neighborhood, Not a Big House | Nona Willis Aronowitz | GOOD
The symbol of American success often involves having the biggest house possible, but our outsized fantasies seem to be shifting.

Reclaimed bus yard begins life as urban wetland | Kate Linthicum | LA Times
A nine-acre park at Avalon Boulevard and 54th Street offers walking paths, native plants and pools with bacteria that clean polluted storm water

Phoenix architect uses desert landscape as inspiration, focuses on simplicity, sustainability | Josselyn Berry | Downtown Devil
Attributes of the desert landscape are re-imagined in the work of Phoenix architect Will Bruder.

Frederick Law Olmsted Is Holding Us Back (There. I Said It.) | ASLA DIRT Blog
A blog post that has caused a stir in the profession in the USA. Is Frederick Law Olmsted holding landscape architects in the USA back?

Landscape Architecture Students Work with Frogtown to Create Pop-Up Tree Nursery | Jolene Brink | University of Minnesota College of Design News
University of Minnesota landscape architecture students are collaborating with Saint Paul Parks and Recreation Department, Frogtown residents, and the Frogtown Neighborhood Association to create a temporary nursery for 4-6 months during 2012.

Don’t Reinvent The Wheel, Steal It: An Urban Planning Award for Cities That Copy | Zak Stone | GOOD
Cities around the world may all be struggling with the same problems, from building affordable housing to boosting internet access, but a lack of dialogue means that local governments rarely copy each other’s successful ideas….

For more news during the week become a World Landscape Architecture fan on Facebook,  Join our LinkedIN group,  Follow us on Twitter @wlandscapearch or Weibo and then  Circle us on Google+
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IMAGE CREDIT: [Flickr Image: Paul Stein]

First Look: ‘Dirt’ edited by Megan Born, Helene Furján, Lily Jencks with Phillip M. Crosby

Dirt

I just got my hands on ‘Dirt’, a new book from PennDesign that is collection on interesting and thought-provocating essays, conversations and images. The books introduction begins with ‘Dirt comes from a position at the intersection of landscape and architecture and presents a selection of work that shares dirty attitudes….’. The book is layered in five chapters Story Lines (Narratives of all kinds), Fertile Minds (brillant projects that do not follow straight lines), Process Work (Elegant and useful things born from the complex), Active Agents (systems & organisation frameworks), Rich Ground (various projects rising from the dirt). The essay material is from various landscape architects, theorists and writers from around the world.

Continue reading First Look: ‘Dirt’ edited by Megan Born, Helene Furján, Lily Jencks with Phillip M. Crosby

This Week in Landscape | 5 February 2012

This weeks round-up of landscape news and views from around the web

Emotional Landscapes: Interview with landscape architect Michael Van Valkenburgh | Gideon Fink Shapiro | BMW Guggenheim Lab
Michael Van Valkenburgh interview about urban landscapes and what they can do

The architecture meltdown | Scott Timberg | Salon
With the economy still in the doldrums where does architecture go from here?

How should we design urban parks? | The Urban Portal | University of Chicago
A social science look at parks, the important differences and the costs of parks in cities.

Building green cities using public/private partnerships | Matthew Kahn | Christian Science Monitor
Public funding for environmentally friendly urban centers benefits private investors, too

Re-greening the Plateau |Michelle Lalonde | Montreal Gazette
Residents are fighting to save their street trees, even if it means removing parking spots

For more news during the week become a World Landscape Architecture fan on Facebook,  Join our LinkedIN group,  Follow us on Twitter @wlandscapearch or Weibo and then  Circle us on Google+
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Second Wave of Modernism II Conference: VIDEOS

Second Wave of Modernism II Conference: VIDEOS

Back in November last year The Cultural Landscape Foundation held the Second Wave of Modernism II: Landscape Complexity and Transformation Conference at MoMA in New York. Various landscape architects and urbanists such as James Corner, Michael Van Valkenburgh, Raymond Jungles, Kathryn Gustafson, Gary Hilderbrand and many more gave lectures on Transformations of Residential and Metropolitan spaces. Now the videos of the lectures have been published with over 4 hours of interesting videos about the transforming the urban environments that we live, design, create and manage everyday. Each Video is approximately 20-25 minutes long so you can watch each one individually or cue the whole set.

Continue reading Second Wave of Modernism II Conference: VIDEOS

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