31st Street Harbor | Chicago USA | AECOM

IMAGE CREDIT | Scott Stevenson, Westrec

The 31st Street Harbor, one of the largest harbors built in Chicago in the last 50 years, transforms an underused portion of Lake Michigan lakeshore into a new public amenity. Unlike traditional harbors that are typically commercial ventures, this project took the approach of integrating the 1,000-slip marina with a park, melding high-tech engineering with thoughtful place-making.
Continue reading 31st Street Harbor | Chicago USA | AECOM

This Week in Landscape | 9 December 2012

This Weeks landscape architecture links from around the world….

Designing the Urban Landscape To Meet 21st Century Challenges | Diane Toomey | Yale Environment 360
Martha Schwartz, a professor at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design, explains in a Yale Environment 360 interview how creative landscape architecture can help cities become models of sustainability in a world facing daunting environmental challenges.

Editorial> Landscape Architecture’s Ascendance | Alan G. Brake | Architect’s Newspaper
In recent years, landscape architects have seen their profile rise. The discipline has gained stature in the public’s imagination, as well as among the allied disciplines of architecture, planning, and even civil and transportation engineering.

Exploring Roosevelt Island’s New Four Freedoms Park | Sara Polsky | Curbed NY
After decades of delays, Louis Kahn’s Four Freedoms Park is now open to the public at the southern end of Roosevelt Island.

A Field Guide to the Wonderful World of Clients  | Ilya Pozin | LinkedIN
“No company should have to put up with tough clients. That’s why I’ve compiled the infographic below, which details a few specific characteristics you can look for to identify when someone is going to be hard to work with.”

What’s in a name? | Julian Raxworthy
“Glorious failure: the landscape architect in the entropic garden. Landscape change results in material outcomes that exhibit the quality of novelty.”

Thinking on Sustainability Through Health | Cathy Markle
“In thinking about the potential of landscape architecture to effect people in their daily lives and in the future…….”


This Week in Landscape | 2 December 2012

this weeks landscape links from around the world

The Green Team Part 5: Tree Tag…You’re It! | Lisa DuRussel | Metropolis Magazine
….there comes a time when a landscape architect moves out from behind her drawing set, turns off AutoCAD, and heads out to a nursery.

New York City AIDS Memorial Approved by Landmarks | Jeremiah Budin | Curbed NY
..The future New York City AIDS Memorial at St. Vincent’s Hospital Park, the agreed upon design from Studio a + i received no opposition from the Landmarks Preservation Commission….

Do Landscape Architects Need to Open Up the Conversation? | Darryl Jones| DIRT
Howe wrapped things up with, “this is a navel we have been picking for generations.” Sensing some unrest from the mostly young audience, Hough declared, “we are the status quo,” referring to himself and the other panelists, “it’s up to you to change the conversation.”

Removal of design from school curriculum is “insanity” – Neville Brody | Dezeen
The creative industries need high-quality creative graduates. If we’re not getting the graduates, we’re not going to sustain the industry,” said Brody.

US coastal cities in danger as sea levels rise faster than expected, study warns | Grantham Research Institute and Duncan Clark | Guardian
Sea-level rise is occurring much faster than scientists expected – exposing millions more Americans to the destructive floods produced by future Sandy-like storms, new research suggests.

BOOK REVIEW | Ecological Design by Nancy Rottle & Ken Yocom

Ecological design is an integral part of landscape architecture and there is a need to explain the basics to students and those looking for a simple guide. Rottle and Yocom’s book – Basics Landscape Architecture 02: Ecological Design is a great resource for those wishing to get a grasp on the principles and also understand how to implement the basics. The book achieves this by giving an outline of each principle and how these were applied in case studies.
Continue reading BOOK REVIEW | Ecological Design by Nancy Rottle & Ken Yocom

Guide to using Pinterest to curate images in design offices and schools

Pinterest is a great way to curate images for the office image library and projects. Starting is as easy as setting up a user account and then creating ‘Boards‘ which are like categories for your images so for landscape office you might start with ‘Boards’ like trees, plants, urban parks, squares, stone, and so on and then start collating images by uploading from your computer, phone or ‘pinning’ images from websites. You just need to remember that the images you are ‘pinning’ are public for everyone on the web to see which can be good for publicising your work or what your working on, but you might want to keep it in-house which I’ll cover later.

Continue reading Guide to using Pinterest to curate images in design offices and schools

Wild Kingdom | Stratford UK | We Made That

The first legacy project to be delivered after the London 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games recently opened at Three Mills Green in Stratford.

Wild Kingdom is a unique and distinctive new play area where children can really let their imagination roam. Wild Kingdom has been designed to allow children of all ages to create their own playground from the natural surroundings. Carefully placed fallen trees, nets and ropes provide climbing frames and swings, whilst giant tree stumps, branches and hammocks provide the tools to build dens. Wild Kingdom also has more traditional play equipment including a maypole swing and trampoline but all have a natural twist.

Continue reading Wild Kingdom | Stratford UK | We Made That

This Week in Landscape | 4 November

This Week in Landscape 4 November

Fallen lindens at the Great Lawn in Central Park | Image Courtesy Central Park Conservancy

This weeks landscape links from across the world

A New Philanthropic Threshold — The Significance of Central Park’s Gift | Charles A. Birnbaum | Huffington Post

Philanthropy and public-private partnerships should not be faulted but encouraged, especially following Hurricane Sandy’s damage to the parks when it’s most needed.

Over 250 trees damaged in Central Park by Hurricane Sandy | Central Park Conservancy
Hurricane Sandy destroyed more than 250 mature trees in Central Park as well as infrastructure, including fencing and benches, throughout the Park’s 843 acres.

A post-hurricane argument about New York’s waterfront infrastructure | Dana Rubenstein | Capital New York
One of several strategies the RPA suggested exploring is tidal barriers, of the sort used in London and Rotterdam.

How to make a landscape edible look incredible | Mary James | UT San Diego
….integrate edibles within an ornamental “backbone.” This way there will always be something to look at, even when edibles have been harvested.

Iskandar – Asia’s newest megacity or a cookie cutter template for cities? | Damian Holmes | LAND Reader
There seems to be this constant rush for ‘experts’ and urban planners to create a ‘template’ for the green, low carbon, sustainable, (insert latest buzz word) city, and ignoring the reason many cities attract people.

 How cyclists and pedestrians can share space on canal towpaths | Laura Laker | Guardian
You are welcome to cycle here but you have got to do it with respect for others. That is what all cyclists need to hear loud and clear.”

Hurricane Sandy on Bikes in NYC from Casey Neistat on Vimeo.

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