This Week in Landscape | 11 March 2012

This weeks round-up of landscape news and views from around the web

Landscape architects shape city’s green spaces | Sharon Litwin | NOLA.com
“Today landscape architecture projects can range from those as modest as private garden designs to those addressing issues of such huge scale as coastal erosion or managing environmental disasters.”

New York’s High Line project should inspire Ann Arbor to create its own urban parks | Will Hathaway & Marc Ross | AnnArbor.com
“The level of interest here in Ann Arbor was palpable in the near capacity Michigan Theater audience. Ann Arborites were enthusiastic about this story of reclaiming underutilized space for use as an urban public park.”

With city’s help, fans of Tampa’s Kiley Garden aim for a comeback | Richard Danielson | Tampa Bay Times
The City Council will look for funds to help complete an ambitious restoration of (Dan)Kiley Garden, often forgotten by locals but admired internationally by landscape architects.

Landscape Optimism: An Interview with Chris Reed | Quilian Riano | Design Observer
An interview with Chris Reed from Stoss Landscape Urbanism

New Urbanism not as simple as once thought, expert says | Blake Aued | Online Athens
Blake reports some interesting  Andres Duany statements  “He now favors a compromise, ecological urbanism. Pave over creeks and get rid of expensive green building standards in very dense areas, he said, because people who live on top of each other are doing the environment a favor by taking up less space.”

“Extreme Beauty and Extreme Vulgarity”: Rem Koolhaas Shares His Thoughts on Japanese Metabolist Architecture | Janelle Zara | Artinfo
“I was friends already with some of them and therefore there was an issue of accessibility,” Koolhaas said. “I was particularly interested to look at the first non-western avant-garde. We are currently living in a situation where a lot of initiatives are no longer ours…”

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Waller Creek Design Competition Shortlist announced

Existing View North of Waller Creek from 6th Street

The Waller Creek Conservancy in Austin, Texas has announced that nine teams from 31 submissions have been selected  to continue onto the next stage of the ‘Design Waller Creek’ design competition.

“Through the competition process, we enlisted the leaders in urban landscape, innovation, sustainable design, theory and practice,” Donald J. Stastny FAIA FAICP FCIP, competition manager of “Design Waller Creek: A Competition,” said.  “The submittals help to define the design challenge and inform the jury and Conservancy about an appropriate mix of design professionals to undertake this complex task. We find within the teams a very strong promise of collaboration and experience in ‘integrated’ design—how different disciplines come together to share talents and skill sets to create environments that are not only functional and sustainable, but contribute to raising the human experience.”
Continue reading Waller Creek Design Competition Shortlist announced

First Look: ‘Dirt’ edited by Megan Born, Helene Furján, Lily Jencks with Phillip M. Crosby

Dirt

I just got my hands on ‘Dirt’, a new book from PennDesign that is collection on interesting and thought-provocating essays, conversations and images. The books introduction begins with ‘Dirt comes from a position at the intersection of landscape and architecture and presents a selection of work that shares dirty attitudes….’. The book is layered in five chapters Story Lines (Narratives of all kinds), Fertile Minds (brillant projects that do not follow straight lines), Process Work (Elegant and useful things born from the complex), Active Agents (systems & organisation frameworks), Rich Ground (various projects rising from the dirt). The essay material is from various landscape architects, theorists and writers from around the world.

Continue reading First Look: ‘Dirt’ edited by Megan Born, Helene Furján, Lily Jencks with Phillip M. Crosby

The CityDeck | Green Bay USA | Stoss Landscape Urbanism

CityDeck | Green Bay USA | Stoss Landscape Urbanism

In the fall, the gingkos, Kentucky coffeetrees, and Liberty elms all turn bright yellow. ©Stoss Landscape Urbanism

The CityDeck is the heart of a multi-phase redevelopment project along Green Bay’s Fox River. The project aims to allow for significantly increased access to the river and to diversify social and ecological life along it.

EXISTING CONDITIONS + CHALLENGES
The site is a 2-acre strip of land, typically measuring 50 to 60 feet wide, that runs along the edge of the Fox River in downtown Green Bay. It is about one-quarter-mile in length and is situated between two bridges that cross the river. At the project’s beginning, adjacent parcels were empty, abandoned (a large yellow warehouse), or in use as parking lots. Nearby buildings turned their back on the riverfront. Unsurprisingly, there was little social or civic life here, and no reason to visit; the elevated walk along existing bulkhead walls prevented any direct access down to the river—as well as up to the city from boats.

Continue reading The CityDeck | Green Bay USA | Stoss Landscape Urbanism

Erie Street Plaza | Milwaukee Wisconsin | Stoss Landscape Urbanism

Erie Street Plaza

The variegated surface extends into the steel marsh, which collects and cleans stormwater from the site. ©Stoss Landscape Urbanism

Erie Street Plaza is a small urban plaza in the Historic Third Ward district of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. The 13,000-square-foot plaza lies at the point where the Milwaukee River meets the Federal Channel as it empties into Lake Michigan. It is the final link in a series of public space activators along the Milwaukee Riverwalk, a three-mile pedestrian and bicycle corridor that connects downtown Milwaukee to the emerging and redeveloping Third Ward, Beerline Districts, and the lakefront beyond. At the beginning of the project’s design, the future of Erie Street Plaza – its users, its function, its programming, even its necessity – were undecided. The urban context was generally one of infrastructure and industry; the site lacked neighbors and potential users. The site itself was a surface parking lot, subject to harsh environmental conditions, including high winds off the lake. Who is it for? How will it be used? This uncertainty, this open-endedness, was at the core of its design.

Continue reading Erie Street Plaza | Milwaukee Wisconsin | Stoss Landscape Urbanism

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