This Week in Landscape | 28 July 2013

Another week in landscape links when food and farming (horizontal and vertical) are in the news

Vertical Farm at Ohare Airport

Chicago O’Hare Airport Vertical Farm | Flickr User chip_munk1

The Next Trend In Landscape Design: Foodscapes | Sustainable Business
“As food security becomes a bigger issue, landscape designers are being encouraged to change their focus from aesthetics to edible fruits and vegetables.” Article responding to
Eating the Landscape: Aesthetic Foodscape Design and its role in Australian Landscape Architecture [pdf] by Joshua Zeunert

The futuristic vertical farms that could solve Hong Kong’s space shortage | Sofia Mitra-Thakur | South China Morning Post
“As populations in China and Hong Kong grow and space for farming rapidly runs out, governments are looking for the answer to the question of how they will feed swelling ranks of people.”

In the future, we will all be home gardeners [future of home living] | PSFK
Riley’s company Windowfarms makes vertical hydroponic platforms for growing food in city windows.

Tending Vertical Gardens | Costance Rosenblum | NY Times
“These leafy expanses, sometimes flecked with flowers, can evoke anything from a tropical jungle to a Monet landscape. But because gardens were intended to be horizontal, not vertical, and because water, left to its own devices, flows down, not sideways, they are challenging to maintain.”

The Scale of Performance: Investigating a Range of Landscape Projects and Benefits | John Whalen, MLA Candidate and Jinki Kim, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign | Landscape Architecture Foundation
“Our team is working at three locations that vary substantially in size and project type, thus creating very interesting and distinct research questions regarding social, environmental and economic benefits.”

The Best Defense Against Catastrophic Storms: Mother Nature | Elizabeth Rauer | Stanford Woods
The study, published in the journal Nature Climate Change, offers the first comprehensive map of the entire U.S. coastline that shows where and how much protection communities get from natural habitats such as sand dunes, coral reefs, sea grasses and mangroves.

The Future of Mobility: Greening the Airport | Clare Lyster | Places – Design Observer
“To mitigate the toxicity of glycol-laced stormwater runoff, several north-latitude airports, including Buffalo Niagara International, have installed engineered wetlands…”

Our Public Infrastructure – Out of Sight, Out of Mind? | Gustavo Jacome | Stantec Is..
“As extreme weather events become more frequent, the question keeps coming up: Why can’t our infrastructure handle it? There are a few reasons…..”

How Better Urban Design Makes Us Healthier, Happier, and Sexier | Jeffrey Tumlin | GOOD
What happens when we redesign the human habitat to take walking out of daily life? Over 35 percent of Americans are now clinically obese. That’s partly because of diet, but also because we’ve designed our cities for cars.

IMAGE CREDIT |  Flickr User chip_munk1

 

This Week In Landscape | 10 March 2013

Laurie Olin Receives Thomas Jefferson Foundation Medal in Architecture | OLIN blog
Founding Partner Laurie Olin has been honored by the University of Virginia and the Thomas Jefferson Foundation with the 2013 Thomas Jefferson Foundation Medal in Architecture.

2013 CSI Firms and Projects Announced | Landscape Architecture Foundation
“A total of 20 design firms and 24 projects have been selected for LAF’s 2013 Case Study Investigation (CSI) program.CSI is a unique research collaboration that matches LAF-funded faculty-student research teams with leading practitioners to document the benefits of exemplary high-performing landscape projects.”

15 Beautiful New York City Trees (And Why They Matter) | Hana Alberts | Curbed NY
“This project, Swett told us, is an homage not only to the physical beauty of some of the city’s underappreciated flora but also trees’ symbolic value”

Wooing Suburban Drivers With Cheap Parking: A Losing Strategy for Cities | Angie Schmitt | Streets Blog
“There may be nothing sadder than distressed cities trying to compete with the suburbs by adding more parking spaces.”

A Wave of Public Art for New York City | Carol Vogel | NY Times
“All around New York City plans are quietly proceeding for this season’s new crop of public art.”

Something Fishy About London’s Most Innovative Urban Farm | Joe Peach | this big city
Kate Hofman and Tom Webster are planning what they call ‘London’s most innovative urban farm’ made from a greenhouse on top of a shipping container.

Multitasking Infrastructures: A Conversation with Sheila Kennedy and Veit Kugel | Urban Omnibus
“The RFP for the landings called for inter-modal passenger terminals and shelters, commuter ferry boat docking facilities, site improvements, and community amenities as a means to encourage public use of the East River waterfront…”

This Week In Landscape | 24 February 2013

Gorse over looking Edinburgh (2012) | Image Credit Flickr user somekindofrob

This week’s Landscape Links from around the world…………

To Control Floods, The Dutch Turn to Nature for Inspiration | Cheryl Katz | Yale e360
The Sand Engine is the signature project of Building with Nature, a consortium of Dutch industries, universities, research institutes, and public water agencies looking to harness natural systems for next-generation hydraulic engineering.

Conservationists hope to turn a disused Paris railway line into a nature trail | Sophie Landrin | Guardian
“So what should Paris do with this secret hideaway? Leave it to run wild, or turn it into a park? The city council has launched a consultation process involving residents and neighbourhood groups, the aim being to take a decision at the end of the year.”

National Parks on a Precipice | Leslie Macmillian | NY Times
“Unless Congress can reach a budget agreement by March 1, the country’s national parks will be hit by a $110 million budget cut, resulting in shuttered camp grounds, shorter seasons, road closings….”

From Denial to Integrated Solutions | Steven Apfelbaum | Metropolis Magazine
“If Sandy has taught us anything, it is that nature will always have the last word—a word that can seem unpredictable from our time-limited perspective. Nature takes the long view, repeatedly adapting to changes.”

2013 CSI Research Fellows Announced | Landscape Architecture Foundation
“Eight faculty Research Fellows have been selected for LAF’s 2013 Case Study Investigation (CSI) program. CSI is a unique research collaboration that matches LAF-funded faculty and student research teams with design firms to document the benefits of exemplary high-performing landscape projects as Landscape Performance Series Case Study Briefs.”

Plantwatch: ‘When gorse is out of bloom, kissing is out of season’ | Paul Simons | Guardian
“Gorse flowers are at their best around this time of year although they stay in flower most of the year, hence the saying “When gorse is out of bloom, kissing is out of season”.”

Living in Lafayette Park | Danielle Aubert, Lana Cavar, and Natasha Chandani | Metropolis Magazine
“The various views are all interesting and they’re all different. It’s surprising how the view of the Meadow from my neighbor’s house just three doors down is quite different from mine.”

Paint Is Not Enough | Erik Griswold | Copenhagenize.com
“Physical separation using traffic islands or raised aprons or recessed curbing as seen in places like Long Beach, California or Missoula, (yes, Missoula!) Montana or Richmond, British Columbia show what is already in use in North America.”

Image Credit | Flickr user somekindofrob

 

Shortlist announced for 2012 World Architecture Festival Awards

The entries for the World Architecture Festival 2012 Awards have been short listed. The festival this year has moved to Singapore and it shows in the projects short listed for 2012 awards with many projects situated in Asia. This is especially true of the Landscape categories with only 2 of 9 projects in the short list for Landscape Projects – Completed designs – urban being situated outside the Asia-Pacific region. It is also interesting to see that no projects were short listed in the categories of Landscape Projects – Completed designs – rural and Future Projects – Landscape. Looking through the short lists for the architecture and urban planning categories there is a large number of Asia-Pacific projects whether this is due to the festival location in 2012 or that a large number of projects have been undertaken in the region due to the stronger economy in comparison with the rest of the world. Congratulations to all those short listed.

Continue reading Shortlist announced for 2012 World Architecture Festival Awards

BOOK REVIEW | SUNBURNT | Editors SueAnne Ware & Julian Raxworthy

Australia is a large country with many diverse landscapes ranging from dry forests through deserts to tropical rainforests. The landscape architecture profession in Australia is just as diverse as the landscape.

Julian Raxworthy and SueAnne Ware have recently edited ‘Sunburnt’, a discourse about the different ways of approaching contemporary landscape design in Australia. Thankfully, they have side-stepped the temptation to produce a coffee table book and have created a book that reflects on each project, thus giving the reader a true understanding of the landscape design, its influences and surroundings.

Continue reading BOOK REVIEW | SUNBURNT | Editors SueAnne Ware & Julian Raxworthy

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