This Week In Landscape | 24 February 2013

Gorse over looking Edinburgh (2012) | Image Credit Flickr user somekindofrob

This week’s Landscape Links from around the world…………

To Control Floods, The Dutch Turn to Nature for Inspiration | Cheryl Katz | Yale e360
The Sand Engine is the signature project of Building with Nature, a consortium of Dutch industries, universities, research institutes, and public water agencies looking to harness natural systems for next-generation hydraulic engineering.

Conservationists hope to turn a disused Paris railway line into a nature trail | Sophie Landrin | Guardian
“So what should Paris do with this secret hideaway? Leave it to run wild, or turn it into a park? The city council has launched a consultation process involving residents and neighbourhood groups, the aim being to take a decision at the end of the year.”

National Parks on a Precipice | Leslie Macmillian | NY Times
“Unless Congress can reach a budget agreement by March 1, the country’s national parks will be hit by a $110 million budget cut, resulting in shuttered camp grounds, shorter seasons, road closings….”

From Denial to Integrated Solutions | Steven Apfelbaum | Metropolis Magazine
“If Sandy has taught us anything, it is that nature will always have the last word—a word that can seem unpredictable from our time-limited perspective. Nature takes the long view, repeatedly adapting to changes.”

2013 CSI Research Fellows Announced | Landscape Architecture Foundation
“Eight faculty Research Fellows have been selected for LAF’s 2013 Case Study Investigation (CSI) program. CSI is a unique research collaboration that matches LAF-funded faculty and student research teams with design firms to document the benefits of exemplary high-performing landscape projects as Landscape Performance Series Case Study Briefs.”

Plantwatch: ‘When gorse is out of bloom, kissing is out of season’ | Paul Simons | Guardian
“Gorse flowers are at their best around this time of year although they stay in flower most of the year, hence the saying “When gorse is out of bloom, kissing is out of season”.”

Living in Lafayette Park | Danielle Aubert, Lana Cavar, and Natasha Chandani | Metropolis Magazine
“The various views are all interesting and they’re all different. It’s surprising how the view of the Meadow from my neighbor’s house just three doors down is quite different from mine.”

Paint Is Not Enough | Erik Griswold | Copenhagenize.com
“Physical separation using traffic islands or raised aprons or recessed curbing as seen in places like Long Beach, California or Missoula, (yes, Missoula!) Montana or Richmond, British Columbia show what is already in use in North America.”

Image Credit | Flickr user somekindofrob

 

This Week in Landscape | 14 October 2012

This weeks landscape links from around the world

At Mouth of Holland Tunnel, a Vision for an Unlikely Oasis | Matt Flegenheimer | NY Times
New Yorkers might look back in wonder at an age when they could not yet take a seat, cozy up with a good book and a cup of coffee, and pass an afternoon beside the exhaust-choked mouth of the Holland Tunnel.

Does It Matter What You Call It? Landscape Urbanism in ‘Scape 2012 | Sarah Kathleen Peck | Landscape Urbanism
“It doesn’t matter what you call it–the larger effort to engage landscape ideas and landscape thinking in broad discourse is what the larger disciplines of landscape, urbanism, planning and architecture need.”

As A City Remakes Itself, Putting Forward A Quietly Radical Plan | Kelsey Campbell-Dollaghan | Fast Co. Design
It’s a familiar refrain throughout America’s emerging urban corridors: We need to rezone. We need to densify pre-existing residential neighborhoods, and rid ourselves of antiquated zoning laws….

Olmsted Scholar Feature: Landscape Architects and the Microbrewery Renaissance | Lee Streitz | Landscape Architecture Foundation Blog
The renaissance of microbreweries is under way. In the last thirty years, there has been a 1700% increase in the number of independent breweries in the United States. Similar to when the number of wineries and vineyards increased dramatically in the late 1990s….

Making a Man Into a Monument | Julia Flynn Siler | NY Times
Ms. Fisher, who is 61, envisioned visitors to the memorial encountering a massive “mountain of despair,” and then walking through a removed slice of that mountain to reach a “stone of hope.”

This Week in Landscape | 9 September 2012

Luanda Angola | Credit Tio Gegeca

This weeks landscape links from around the world

 Designers don’t always know what’s best | Michael Short | smh.com.au
A single mother in a Cambodian slum inspired Lucinda Hartley(Urban designer, landscape architect and activist) to change the world.

Reflections from OLIN’s Interns | OLIN Blog
Interns from OLIN’s  ten-week internship program give their thoughts on what they learned.

Budding landscape architect Viktor Filipi | Radio Praha
“Landscape or garden architecture is a bit of an unusual field. Like classic architecture it also allows you to create, but we are working not with static elements but with vegetation and also time…….”

Landscape Architecture Accessibility and Communication | Lucy Wang | Landscape Architecture Foundation
 ”….What’s most interesting to me is what social media can do for promoting the awareness of green space, and ultimately, lead to a better public understanding of landscape architecture…”

UN calls for policies to address rapid urbanization in developing countries
 A United Nations official has called for the development of national urban policies to ensure developing countries are not overwhelmed by urbanization, which he compared to a tsunami for its staggering growth which can surpass cities’ capacities to manage it.

As Temps Rise, Cities Combat ‘Heat Island’ Effect | Richard Harris | NPR
More than 20,000 high-temperature records have been broken so far this year in the United States. And the heat is especially bad in cities, which are heating up about twice as fast as the rest of the planet.

IMAGE CREDIT: Flickr User tio gegeaca

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