This Week In Landscape | 25 August 2013

Another week of great landscape architecture content for this week reading….

Ideas to build on | Corydon Ireland | Harvard Gazette
Reed called the Flux City projects “speculative.” To date, many American responses to sea level rise have fallen into two camps: “Evacuate or build a bigger wall,” he said. “Maybe there are other ways.”

charles jencks’ cells of life is a manmade landscape | designboom
levels of smooth grassy planes stack atop each other in ‘cells of life’ — a monumental, on-site land installation conceived by american artist charles jencks for jupiter artland.

QueensWay Park Project Reaches Funding, Planning Milestones | Jennifer Maloney | WSJ
The effort to transform a 3½-mile stretch of abandoned railway tracks in Queens into a park reminiscent of Manhattan’s High Line has reached two milestones: Organizers have raised $1 million for the design and planning phase and next week they will launch a feasibility study spearheaded by two New York firms.

Rethinking Rivers: Exploring the Benefits of Ecologically-Based River Management | Shanna Atherton | Landscape Architecture Foundation
Restoring natural processes to degraded or heavily managed river systems while respecting human needs is no easy feat, but this summer the Case Study Investigation (CSI) program gave our research team the opportunity to look at three projects that have done just that.

Bringing Back the Night: The Fight Against Light Pollution | Paul Bogard | Yale enivironment 360
“As evidence mounts that excessive use of light is harming wildlife and adversely affecting human health, new initiatives in France and elsewhere are seeking to turn down the lights that flood an ever-growing part of the planet.”

Is there such thing as good urban sprawl? | Paul Brown | ABC
“MODERN PLANNERS ARE designing compact cities, believing tightly controlled zones are better for the environment. but new research suggests the opposite: urban sprawl might be a better option”

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This Week in Landscape | 28 July 2013

Another week in landscape links when food and farming (horizontal and vertical) are in the news

Vertical Farm at Ohare Airport

Chicago O’Hare Airport Vertical Farm | Flickr User chip_munk1

The Next Trend In Landscape Design: Foodscapes | Sustainable Business
“As food security becomes a bigger issue, landscape designers are being encouraged to change their focus from aesthetics to edible fruits and vegetables.” Article responding to
Eating the Landscape: Aesthetic Foodscape Design and its role in Australian Landscape Architecture [pdf] by Joshua Zeunert

The futuristic vertical farms that could solve Hong Kong’s space shortage | Sofia Mitra-Thakur | South China Morning Post
“As populations in China and Hong Kong grow and space for farming rapidly runs out, governments are looking for the answer to the question of how they will feed swelling ranks of people.”

In the future, we will all be home gardeners [future of home living] | PSFK
Riley’s company Windowfarms makes vertical hydroponic platforms for growing food in city windows.

Tending Vertical Gardens | Costance Rosenblum | NY Times
“These leafy expanses, sometimes flecked with flowers, can evoke anything from a tropical jungle to a Monet landscape. But because gardens were intended to be horizontal, not vertical, and because water, left to its own devices, flows down, not sideways, they are challenging to maintain.”

The Scale of Performance: Investigating a Range of Landscape Projects and Benefits | John Whalen, MLA Candidate and Jinki Kim, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign | Landscape Architecture Foundation
“Our team is working at three locations that vary substantially in size and project type, thus creating very interesting and distinct research questions regarding social, environmental and economic benefits.”

The Best Defense Against Catastrophic Storms: Mother Nature | Elizabeth Rauer | Stanford Woods
The study, published in the journal Nature Climate Change, offers the first comprehensive map of the entire U.S. coastline that shows where and how much protection communities get from natural habitats such as sand dunes, coral reefs, sea grasses and mangroves.

The Future of Mobility: Greening the Airport | Clare Lyster | Places – Design Observer
“To mitigate the toxicity of glycol-laced stormwater runoff, several north-latitude airports, including Buffalo Niagara International, have installed engineered wetlands…”

Our Public Infrastructure – Out of Sight, Out of Mind? | Gustavo Jacome | Stantec Is..
“As extreme weather events become more frequent, the question keeps coming up: Why can’t our infrastructure handle it? There are a few reasons…..”

How Better Urban Design Makes Us Healthier, Happier, and Sexier | Jeffrey Tumlin | GOOD
What happens when we redesign the human habitat to take walking out of daily life? Over 35 percent of Americans are now clinically obese. That’s partly because of diet, but also because we’ve designed our cities for cars.

IMAGE CREDIT |  Flickr User chip_munk1

 

This Week in Landscape | 24 March 2013

Landscape links from around world published in the last week

What is a Landscape Architect? | Katrina | Exscapes
“America isn’t keeping up with advances in planning issues and sustainable design. Businesses should be soaking up all the landscape architects they can. Many are also giving up their title because it is expensive to maintain a practicing license and many are not able to keep up with it due to layoffs.”

From Parking Lot to Paradise – the Revenge of Urban Agriculture | Charles Birnbaum | The Cultural Landscape Foundation
“Today, however, we have home food production, urban farming, productive gardens, or whatever else you might want to call this movement – and it’s hot.”

The Fearless Grady Clay | Daniel Jost | Landscape Architecture Magazine
“Few journalists have had a greater impact on the field of landscape architecture than Grady Clay, Honorary ASLA, who died on Sunday at the age of 96. He was the editor of this magazine for nearly a quarter century—from 1960 to 1984.”

Out now: Topos 82, About Landscape
Latest edition of Topos Magazine – “All around the world people associate something different with the term landscape.”

Faculty Wins Minneapolis Creative City Challenge | LSU – Robert Reich Landscape School of Landscape Architecture 
Director and Associate Professor Bradley Cantrell working with Invivia + urbainDRC won the Minneapolis Creative City Challenge with their proposal: The Minneapolis Interavtive Macro Mood Installation (MIMMI).

New Filipino landscape architects as results of Landscape Architect Licensure Examination announced
The Professional Regulation Commission (PRC) announces that 20 out of 31 passed the Landscape Architect Licensure Examination given by the Board of Landscape Architecture in Manila this March 2013.

We Moved! | Landscape Architecture Foundation
In line with the organization’s growth, LAF has moved to a new office in downtown Washington,

This Week In Landscape | 10 March 2013

Laurie Olin Receives Thomas Jefferson Foundation Medal in Architecture | OLIN blog
Founding Partner Laurie Olin has been honored by the University of Virginia and the Thomas Jefferson Foundation with the 2013 Thomas Jefferson Foundation Medal in Architecture.

2013 CSI Firms and Projects Announced | Landscape Architecture Foundation
“A total of 20 design firms and 24 projects have been selected for LAF’s 2013 Case Study Investigation (CSI) program.CSI is a unique research collaboration that matches LAF-funded faculty-student research teams with leading practitioners to document the benefits of exemplary high-performing landscape projects.”

15 Beautiful New York City Trees (And Why They Matter) | Hana Alberts | Curbed NY
“This project, Swett told us, is an homage not only to the physical beauty of some of the city’s underappreciated flora but also trees’ symbolic value”

Wooing Suburban Drivers With Cheap Parking: A Losing Strategy for Cities | Angie Schmitt | Streets Blog
“There may be nothing sadder than distressed cities trying to compete with the suburbs by adding more parking spaces.”

A Wave of Public Art for New York City | Carol Vogel | NY Times
“All around New York City plans are quietly proceeding for this season’s new crop of public art.”

Something Fishy About London’s Most Innovative Urban Farm | Joe Peach | this big city
Kate Hofman and Tom Webster are planning what they call ‘London’s most innovative urban farm’ made from a greenhouse on top of a shipping container.

Multitasking Infrastructures: A Conversation with Sheila Kennedy and Veit Kugel | Urban Omnibus
“The RFP for the landings called for inter-modal passenger terminals and shelters, commuter ferry boat docking facilities, site improvements, and community amenities as a means to encourage public use of the East River waterfront…”

This Week In Landscape | 3 March 2013

This Week In Landscape | 3 March 2013

Vancouver | Coal Harbour | Flickr User alans1948

Landscape links from around the world during the week of 25 February to 3 March 2013

Landscape Performance Research: The Economics of Change | Jason Twill, LEED AP and Stuart Cowan, PhD | Landscape Architecture Foundation
The overarching goal of The Economics of Change is to shift mainstream real estate practices to document the full value of a built environment that is compatible with healthy, natural systems.

The Most Important Urban Design Decision Vancouver Ever Made? | Brent Toderian | Huffington Post
“In 1997, the city approved its first transformative Transportation Plan. Co-written through a first-time (and not easy) partnership between city planners and transportation engineers, the plan was a game-changer for our city-making model in many ways….”

The Green Team Part 10: POPS for the People…and the Developer | Zeina Zahalan | Metropolis Magazine
“The primary goal of POPS is to unite function with aesthetics—to create public spaces that provide respite in the city’s dense urban fabric.”

Urbanization of the People Must Follow That of the Land | Lan Fang | Caixin
The core of urbanization lies not only in large-scale city building and expansion of industrial parks, but also in the great migration of people from farm villages into cities.

Pedestrian Friendly Streetscape in Santa Cruz | William Langston | A Landscape Architect and a Passport
“So when we were in Puerto Ayora, Santa Cruz Island I was immediately taken by the impressive streetscape improvements to the main streets in town.”

Sequestration Frustration, Close to Home | OLIN Blog
“Clearly the politics of this question run deep, and as advocates of the urban public realm, we can’t hope to remain unbiased. But maybe if we, as advocates and citizens, can join the conversation, we can encourage the power players in Washington to start talking as well.”

A Blog’s Adieu | New York Times
Sadly, the New York Times Green blog has been shutdown to focus on other areas.

IMAGE CREDIT | Flickr User alans1948

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