Rosa Barba Landscape Prize awarded at 8th International Biennial of Landscape Architecture

Auckland waterfront

Rosa Barba Landscape Prize was awarded to Australian landscape architecture firm, Taylor Cullity Lethlean (TCL) and New Zealand firm, Wraight + Associates (WA) for the transformation of Auckland‟s waterfront which was completed in 2011.

Continue reading Rosa Barba Landscape Prize awarded at 8th International Biennial of Landscape Architecture

This Week in Landscape | 28 September 2014

Swing Time (2014) – long from HYA on Vimeo.
Höweler + Yoon Architecture | Swing Time is an interactive playscape composed of 20 illuminated ring-shaped swings. The installation activates a temporary park between the Boston Convention and Exhibition Center and D Street to create a new type of city park.

What a Park’s Design Does to Your Brain | Rebecca Tushus-Dubrow | Next City
But Olszewska, now a doctoral candidate in landscape architecture and urban ecology at the University of Porto in Portugal, persevered. With a neuroscience professor at the university, she conducted a pilot project that culminated, earlier this year, in a conference paper titled “Urban Planning, Neurosciences and Contemplation for Improving Well-being in Our Cities.”

The Machine is a Garden | Amanda Kolson Hurley | Foreign Policy
In 1898, an unassuming British stenographer hatched the idea of “garden cities” as an antidote to dirty, crowded London. Today, a revival of that idea is spreading from the U.K. to China to India — and some people think it just might help save the planet.

LI appoints author for BIM for landscape book | Landscape Institute
“BIM for Landscape will be the first book of its kind, and is aimed at landscape practitioners, project leaders and decision-makers working with landscape 0n a BIM project. The book will be published in early 2016 by Taylor & Francis, publisher of the LI’s Guidelines for Landscape and Visual Impact Assessment (GLVIA).”

Continue reading This Week in Landscape | 28 September 2014

KERB 22 Launches

Kerb 22: Remoteness Launch from Melbourne Books on Vimeo.

The 22nd edition of KERB – Journal of Landscape Architecture launched at the RMIT University Design Hub in Melbourne, Australia. The journal is unique in being compiled and edited each year by a small group of students, who select a range of articles pertinent to the dedicated theme of each edition. The theme for KERB 22 is remoteness.

Kerb 22 interrogates the notion of remoteness from four viewpoints, identifying opportunities of engagement within spaces balancing on the edge of tangibility, or deeply virtually sited. This issue of Kerb aims to establish connectivity between the entities that lie within a greater territory, calling for the interrogation of space. Whether through the distribution of physical settlements or through the definition of virtual boundaries, mediating the divide places remoteness within a near-instantaneous reach; enabling us to grasp and employ the remote as a tool for spatial negotiation.

Contributors for KERB 22 include Benjamin H. Bratton, Mond Qu, Tiago Torres-Campos, Ryan Dewey, Alex Breedon, Gross.Max, Frances Edith Cooper, José Alfredo Ramirez/Clara Olóriz, Pierre Bélanger, Rene Van Meeuwen, Michael Light, Casey Lance Brown/Rob Holmes, James Ramsey, Ja Kyung Kim, William Clancey, Mario Accordino/Jarrad Newman, Lateral Office, Natalya Egon/Noel Turgeon, Niki Kakali/Anastasia Kotenko, Ian Strange, Jock Gilbert and Shaun Gladwell

Purchase your copy at Melbourne Books. The Print Edition is AUD$24.95 (plus Postage) or $14.95 for Digital

This Week in Landscape | 31 August 2014

Pounding the pavement will make these ISU students better landscape architects
It’s summertime and the learning is easy. But the work is hard for nine Iowa State University landscape architecture students who are finishing their internship project at the Iowa Correctional Institution for Women (ICIW) in Mitchellville. For them, pounding the pavement has taken on a whole new meaning.

What kids can teach architects about design | Maria Patsarika | Washington Post
“The architects we interviewed overwhelmingly thought that children brought fresh perspectives and uninhibited curiosity, leading them to explore alternative scenarios.”

Landscape Architects Back in Red Hot Demand | Andrew Heaton | sourceable
“In its most recent announcement, the Australian Institute of Landscape Architects says that compared with May and June, the number of advertised positions on its web site was up by 50 percent in July and August.”

Rethinking the lawn in an age of environmental crises | David Quick | Post & Courier
“Some are starting to say it’s not, for both practical and environmental reasons, and are converting a part or all of their lawns to a combination of gravel, “green” ground cover and food or flower gardens.”

Could Olmsted & Bartholomew’s 100-year-old parks plan finally happen in Los Angeles | Sam Lubell | ArchPaper
The idea started in 2005, when the Amigos de Los Rios laid out a 17-mile loop of parks and greenways (often underutilized spaces owned by public agencies) along the Río Hondo and San Gabriel Rivers on the east side of Los Angeles.

Lessons for the Shore | Sasaki Associates – Blog
Coastal communities along the eastern seaboard were not always in such danger. Early settlers built their towns along protected waterways rather than directly on ocean shores to insulate themselves from threats.

The Delta District | Vinge, Denmark | SLA

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The Delta District in the future city Vinge is an example of how landscaping can create dual functions:  promote better communities and prevent flooding. A man-made delta and creeks handle rainwater and provide the city district with unique qualities for residents to gather around.

Continue reading The Delta District | Vinge, Denmark | SLA

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