Waller Creek Design Competition Shortlist announced

Existing View North of Waller Creek from 6th Street

The Waller Creek Conservancy in Austin, Texas has announced that nine teams from 31 submissions have been selected  to continue onto the next stage of the ‘Design Waller Creek’ design competition.

“Through the competition process, we enlisted the leaders in urban landscape, innovation, sustainable design, theory and practice,” Donald J. Stastny FAIA FAICP FCIP, competition manager of “Design Waller Creek: A Competition,” said.  “The submittals help to define the design challenge and inform the jury and Conservancy about an appropriate mix of design professionals to undertake this complex task. We find within the teams a very strong promise of collaboration and experience in ‘integrated’ design—how different disciplines come together to share talents and skill sets to create environments that are not only functional and sustainable, but contribute to raising the human experience.”
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First Look: ‘Dirt’ edited by Megan Born, Helene Furján, Lily Jencks with Phillip M. Crosby

Dirt

I just got my hands on ‘Dirt’, a new book from PennDesign that is collection on interesting and thought-provocating essays, conversations and images. The books introduction begins with ‘Dirt comes from a position at the intersection of landscape and architecture and presents a selection of work that shares dirty attitudes….’. The book is layered in five chapters Story Lines (Narratives of all kinds), Fertile Minds (brillant projects that do not follow straight lines), Process Work (Elegant and useful things born from the complex), Active Agents (systems & organisation frameworks), Rich Ground (various projects rising from the dirt). The essay material is from various landscape architects, theorists and writers from around the world.

Continue reading First Look: ‘Dirt’ edited by Megan Born, Helene Furján, Lily Jencks with Phillip M. Crosby

This Week in Landscape | 8 January 2012

This Week in Landscape – A Weekly roundup of landscape news and stories from around the world.

Mall of America Carpark (c) Google

Paved, but Still Alive(Taking parking lots seriously as public-spaces) | Michael Kimmelman | New York Times
There are millions if not billions of carspaces in the USA and there is an oversupply with many carspaces remaining empty and these public spaces remain hot black asphalt deserts throughout cities across the world. Michael gives us some examples of successful carpark designs. Read More

The Grid at 200: Lines That Shaped Manhattan | Michael Kimmelman | New York Times
A look back at the grid that made New York the city it is today defining architecture, landscape, spaces and the lives on millions over time. Read More…

Waste opportunity - Creative management of landfill and recycling can transform landscape and generate income | Sarah Murray | FT.com
What happens to your rubbish? Sarah tales a look at how organisations and people around the world are dealing with landfills and makes reference to the Freshkill Project. Read More

See the building from the Trees | Sarah Williams Goldhagen | New York Times

How can cognitive neuroscience influnce the way that architects, landscape architects, planners and engineers are designing? Why are architects using tree metaphors in their designs for buildings? Sarah looks at tree metaphors and how we look at the built environment. Read More….

Designing Water | Joseph G. Brin | Metropolis Magazine
An interesting article that touches on the various design solutions to Water Management within cities including Rain Gardens, Permeable pavement and others. Read More

Walk-up windows are good urbanism | Dan Malouff  | Greater Greater Washington
Sidewalks(Footpaths) are interesting concrete pedestrians route that connect destinations, often we walk doorway to doorway with the odd cafe spilling out onto the space. Walk-up windows are a way to break the monotony of street life. Dan looks at Georgetown and a couple of its walk-up windows. Read More….

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Ojama | Los Angeles USA | AHBE Landscape Architects

Ojama | Los Angeles | AHBE Landscape Architects
“Ojama” is a Japanese word which generally means to evoke a sense of interruption or an interim pause.

The Ojama installation is about creating a hindrance or momentary interruption in our daily experience of space. This temporary art installation is an exploration of space, time, materiality, and our experience of nature in the urban environment.

Continue reading Ojama | Los Angeles USA | AHBE Landscape Architects

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