This Week In Landscape | 1 September 2013

Another week of landscape links from around the world. Send your news, links and events to contribute@worldlandscapearchitect.com

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Infrared Image New York | Image Credit Nickolay Lamm @ Storagefront.com

Infrared Photos Reveal the Brutal Urban Heatscape | Wired  When summer temperatures rise to uncomfortable levels, cities take a bigger beating than the rest of the landscape. This urban heat effect is especially brutal in big, dense, concrete-dominated cities like New York.

Local landscape architect calls for improved landscape quality | James Qualtrough | Isle News
“‘It’s never been more important to plant trees in gardens, streets and parks. We need to introduce better planning and management of our green areas to encourage more people to take action.”

Native plants are a priority | Rebecca Trigger | The West Australian
Landscape architects are looking to native species as they manage restricted water access in a drying climate.

Delhi’s upcoming park to rival New York’s Central Park | The Economic Times
“In a tangle of forgotten, overgrown brush in the heart of India’s capital, a quiet plan has been hatched to change the landscape of one of the world’s most populous cities.An intricate Mughal garden is being created.”

Continue reading This Week In Landscape | 1 September 2013

2014 IFLA Sir Geoffrey Jellicoe Award | Call for Nominations

The International Federation of Landscape Architects(IFLA) has put out the call for the 2014 Sir Geoffrey Jellicoe Award. The highest honor that the IFLA can bestow upon a landscape architect. The annual Award recognises a living landscape architect whose lifetime achievements and contributions have had a unique and lasting impact on the welfare of society and the environment and on the promotion of the profession of landscape architecture.
Continue reading 2014 IFLA Sir Geoffrey Jellicoe Award | Call for Nominations

Lotus Lake Park | Kunshan China | Integrated Planning and Design

Lotus-Lake-Park_IPD_Kunshan_02
The City of Kunshan has a unique history and its people have been responsible for establishing many of the cultural traditions for this region; Kun Opera, canal villages, hairy crab, the Double-headed Lotus flower and a long history of aquaculture production are all notable.  As a gateway for the city’s westward expansion, Lotus Lake Park had to define and demonstrate the character of the future public realm in the west.
Continue reading Lotus Lake Park | Kunshan China | Integrated Planning and Design

This Week In Landscape | 18 August 2013

A weekly summary of links from around the world to keep you informed about the latest news in landscape architecture

How urban scars are being remade into vibrant, vital playgrounds | Alex Bozikovic | Globe & Mail
“One of the mistakes of the late 20th century was to think of parks as an escape from the city,” says Michael Van Valkenburgh, the landscape architect whose office is designing Corktown Common. “I think it’s very different to think of a park as an essential piece of the city, as opposed to ‘not urban.’”

Q&A: Kim Mathews and Signe Nielsen | Susan S. Szenasy| Metropolis Magazine
“Here the principals of the New York firm, Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects, Kim Mathews, RLA, ASLA and Signe Nielsen, RLA, FASLA, talk about the evolution of their profession, their commitment to teaching, writing, lecturing, their research-informed work, as well as the new appreciation of design in the public realm.”

He beautifies an already beautiful San Diego | Nina Garin | UT San Diego
“Landscape architect Glen Schmidt is responsible for some of the county’s best outdoor spaces”

Can you see the landscape architecture for the trees? | Christopher Vollan | Rize
Landscape architecture, at its best, is much more than the arrangement of greenery, furniture and lawn. Like building architecture, it requires deep knowledge of site history and characteristics balanced with future intentions. As a reflection of our high aspirations in this regard, @MtPleasant2016 is proud to have engaged PWL Landscape architects…”

ASLA survey shows uneven economic picture for Landscape Architecture firms | ASLA
Landscape architecture firms are experiencing sluggish but steady growth as they emerge from the recession, according to the American Society of Landscape Architects’ second quarter 2013 Business Quarterly survey.

Continue reading This Week In Landscape | 18 August 2013

This Week In Landscape | 4 August 2013

University of Minnesota Landscape Arboretum branches out with art garden | Tom Meersman | Star Tribune
“Thanks to an unprecedented donation by a retired Wayzata couple, the arboretum has acquired in one fell swoop a permanent new sculpture garden with 23 world-class art works that normally would take many years and millions of dollars to collect.”

Philadelphia’s Incremental Landscape | OLIN
“Incremental landscape infrastructure can create opportunities to improve ecologic functions, enhance the civic experience, and ignite economic investment.”

Landscape scenic quality assessment techniques | Tom Turner | Garden Visit
“….it would then be necessary to find out which areas ARE of low scenic quality and, I am sorry to say, the UK landscape architecture profession appears to be ducking this question.”

Harvard leader in urban planning, waterfront restoration to share keys to success | Holly Bechiri | The Rapidian
“Primarily, my role is not to tell you about Grand Rapids,” says Krieger of his upcoming talk, “but to show what other cities have done relative to waterfronts as Grand Rapids is about to embark on some planning regarding your urban waterfront.”

Continue reading This Week In Landscape | 4 August 2013

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