This Week In Landscape | 8 September 2013

Weekly round up of landscape architecture links

More Parks and Green Space | Adrian Benepe | New York Times
“The next mayor[New York] will not face the crisis that Koch faced — in fact, the Bloomberg administration presided over the biggest program of park building since the 1930s. But considerable challenges and opportunities face the next administration, which will need to maintain the new parks while continuing to build for a growing city.”

Landscape Institute Chief executive Alastair McCapra to leave for new job | Landscape Institute
Chief executive Alastair McCapra is leaving the Landscape Institute at the end of October to take up the post of CEO at the Chartered Institute of Public Relations.

Q&A: Lise Cormier, landscape architect, on sparking an international plant-sculpture craze | Molly Petrilla | Smartplanet.com
smart planet spoke with Cormier about the art form’s soaring international popularity, the industry developing around it,

On a Remote Island, Lessons In How Ecosystems Function | Fred Pearce | Yale Enivironment 360
“Transformed by British sailors in the 19th century, Ascension Island in the South Atlantic has a unique tropical forest consisting almost entirely of alien species. Scientists say that what has happened there challenges some basic assumptions about ecosystems and evolution.”

Continue reading This Week In Landscape | 8 September 2013

This Week In Landscape | 17 March 2013

Landscape Links for the week 10-17 March 2013

Charles Birnbaum on the future of landscape architecture | Charles Birnbaum | Dwell
Landscape architecture, however, has fared worse. In fact, fewer than 2,500 of the 80,000-plus National Register sites boast any significant landscape design.

Adapting to climate change on the Mississippi | Washington University in St.Louis
In the political realm, climate change remains a point of debate. But for architects, engineers, urban designers and others charged with managing its effects—the storms and floods followed, whiplash style, by drought and water scarcity—the evidence is in.

The City in 2050: Bridging the Gaps and Bringing into Focus the Future of Cities | Carla Guerrera | Stantec Is
The next four decades are full of opportunity for growth but require adaptability, and resiliency.

Los Angeles 2013 | LA Times
On April 3, 1988, the Los Angeles Times Magazine published a 25-year look ahead to 2013.

A New Movement for The New City: Reallocating Space Away from the Car | Bruce McVean | This Big City
If the private car’s time is up, the age of the bicycle is just beginning. Bikes, the ultimate form of private urban transport, are space efficient, genuinely zero emissions, healthy, sociable, affordable and fun.

Citizens are key to shaping the city | Marian Scott | The Gazette
Citizens need to do whatever it takes to make their voices heard, Lambert said. “Take to the streets with placards and petitions. Because when you get the public involved, just look at the Old Port,” she said.

Camden Amphitheatre & Public Library Receive National Historic Landmark Status | Alice McFadden | The Free Press
The Camden Amphitheatre and Public Library is one of the few public projects of Fletcher Steele, one of America’s premier practitioners of 20th-century landscape design.

This Week in Landscape | 12 February 2012

This weeks round-up of landscape news and views from around the web

Tribeca Neighborhood has a High Walkability Score (Flickr Image: Paul Stein)

Most Americans Want a Walkable Neighborhood, Not a Big House | Nona Willis Aronowitz | GOOD
The symbol of American success often involves having the biggest house possible, but our outsized fantasies seem to be shifting.

Reclaimed bus yard begins life as urban wetland | Kate Linthicum | LA Times
A nine-acre park at Avalon Boulevard and 54th Street offers walking paths, native plants and pools with bacteria that clean polluted storm water

Phoenix architect uses desert landscape as inspiration, focuses on simplicity, sustainability | Josselyn Berry | Downtown Devil
Attributes of the desert landscape are re-imagined in the work of Phoenix architect Will Bruder.

Frederick Law Olmsted Is Holding Us Back (There. I Said It.) | ASLA DIRT Blog
A blog post that has caused a stir in the profession in the USA. Is Frederick Law Olmsted holding landscape architects in the USA back?

Landscape Architecture Students Work with Frogtown to Create Pop-Up Tree Nursery | Jolene Brink | University of Minnesota College of Design News
University of Minnesota landscape architecture students are collaborating with Saint Paul Parks and Recreation Department, Frogtown residents, and the Frogtown Neighborhood Association to create a temporary nursery for 4-6 months during 2012.

Don’t Reinvent The Wheel, Steal It: An Urban Planning Award for Cities That Copy | Zak Stone | GOOD
Cities around the world may all be struggling with the same problems, from building affordable housing to boosting internet access, but a lack of dialogue means that local governments rarely copy each other’s successful ideas….

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IMAGE CREDIT: [Flickr Image: Paul Stein]

Putting the green in the O.C. Great Park

latimes.com reports

Emile Haddad has of what would become the site of the Orange County Great Park and the location of his biggest development project dates from 1986……

The cost and pace of work on the project, which at the moment consists of a tethered balloon ride and a small “preview” park, have been the subject of nearly ceaseless political bickering, not least because the ultimate price tag has, well, ballooned to nearly $1.4 billion. About a third of that money was supposed to be financed through residential and commercial development undertaken by Haddad’s firm…..

Read the full article at the [SOURCE: latimes.com – Putting the green in Orange County Great Park]