STUDENT PROJECT | The Petite Camargue, a new vision for industrial landscapes

The industrial salt production at Aigues-Mortes

“The Petite Camargue is a landscape whose characteristics have been moulded by human settlement and activities over time: it’s an essential economic and environment interdependence. One of these activities, the salt production, has been present for centuries on the vast lagoons of Aigues-Mortes, and it has shaped the landscape. Salt marshes are wasteland from the mining process, that shapes and manufacturers landscape forms and different micro-climates. Indeed, through human activity, water and salt and the major ecological landscape elements.

Continue reading STUDENT PROJECT | The Petite Camargue, a new vision for industrial landscapes

This Week in Landscape | 10 August 2014

Postindustrial Landscapes from Kelly Flanagan on Vimeo.
“This is a short clip of a longer documentary on the Architectural Association Visiting School’s workshop at the Academy of Art University’s School of Architecture exploring Postindustrial Landscapes. During this 10 day intensive workshop, students and instructors designed a flying object with remote censoring to experience an elevated space at Ocean Beach in San Francisco.”

The Need to Develop Flora and Fauna Biometric Tools for Urban Planning | Dr. Mark Hostetler | The Nature of Cites
“…we have a plethora of empirical data that suggests how various urban designs would impact various species. However, these studies have not affected actual planning decisions in most cities (there are exceptions of course).”

Can the Architectural Competition Be Revived? | Angela Fedele | Sourceable
“The panelists noted architectural competitions could evolve into a tender process – one that would make governments happy but could limit the opportunity for the industry in general and emerging professionals and firms in particular.”

SITES Program Certifies Sustainable Landscape Projects from Seattle to Atlanta | SITES
“The Sustainable Sites Initiative™ (SITES™) program has certified four new landscapes, including a pocket park in Washington state, a mixed-use development in northern California, a historic Civil-War era preserve in New York, and the headquarters of an architecture firm in Georgia.”

Pedestrian etiquette, gormless phone users, and the rise of the ‘meanderthal’ | Tim Waterman | The Conversation
Simple street etiquette could improve safety and comfort for all, and save millions in signage, policing, separation of traffic, and various other complex and expensive means of regulating public space.

Rules don’t define quality architecture | David Killick | Stuff
“Perhaps a key step to creating a more attractive neighbourhood is to identify the main elements: aesthetics, heritage and context, efficient use of space, good connections, consideration of the natural environment, and energy use, to name just a few.”

Will Toronto’s ambitious push to grow its urban canopy pay off? | Kat Sieniuc | Globe & Mail
“If you take down a tree in Toronto, you’ll be required to plant new trees to replenish the urban forest. But how many saplings does it take to fill the place of a mature tree?”

This Week in Landscape | 2 February 2014

Interesting landscape reading from across the web with some thought provoking material before you start your working week.


High Lines and park life: why more green isn’t always greener for cities | Owen Hatherley | Guardian
“Transforming old industrial areas into urban woodland may look nice but can be conterproductive[sic] in the long run” – Interesting read, but still wondering how the Highline is conterproductive[sic] in the long run.

‘Open spaces needed for meetings’ | Riyan Ramanath V, | Times of India
“Lack of such open areas inside the city is forcing communities, political, religious and social groups to use smaller spaces, which is resulting in traffic congestion on the roads.”

See How NYC Streets Got More Pedestrian-Friendly In 25 Years | Curbed NY | Zoe Rosenberg
Great images of before and after the implementation of pedestrian/bike friendly road design

How town planning can make us thin and healthy: Architects show that more green space and less housing density has a clear effect on public health | Charlie Cooper | Independent
“With responsibility for public healthcare devolved now from central Government to local authorities, it’s vital that planners and developers take the lead in ensuring healthier cities,” said. RIBA’s president, Stephen Hodder.

Continue reading This Week in Landscape | 2 February 2014

Chemin-Qui-Marche Lookout | Montreal Canada | GROUPE IBI-CHBA


Image Credit | Alexis Nollet

The planning concept for the park is an expression of the traces of its past and the important moments of its history. The esplanade also highlights the spirit of place found in the contemporary urban grid of the neighborhood. The park becomes a witness to the site’s history, commemorating it through three key landscape elements: the river and its piers, the vestiges of former railways lines, and the historic city in development.

Continue reading Chemin-Qui-Marche Lookout | Montreal Canada | GROUPE IBI-CHBA

Ken Fletcher Park | Tennyson Australia | Form Landscape Architects


Laser cut screens, arbour, amphitheatre and public plaza | Image Credit – Yan Chen

Named after one of Brisbane’s greatest tennis players, Ken Fletcher Park is located on a former coal-fired power station site alongside the Tennyson Reach of the Brisbane River. The 2.9 hectare north facing site has emerged from its industrial past to become a contemporary district all abilities riverside park. Environmental and social sustainability initiatives are underpinned by the reuse of a post industrial site and recycling of its materials for the purpose of creating an innovative community based recreational facility. This facility provides equitable opportunities and outcomes for all its members, despite their level of ability or disability.
Continue reading Ken Fletcher Park | Tennyson Australia | Form Landscape Architects

Landscape Testaccio | Rome Italy | Melania Bugiani

In the old abattoir of Rome- today the Museum of Contemporary Art- two public gardens dealing with botanical spontaneity. On the occasion of Enel contemporanea 2012, an international art event that takes place in Rome annually, 75m of evergreens, perennial herbs and impromptu flowers alternate in volume and density and translate the vitality and ecological memory of the old meat district of Testaccio.
Continue reading Landscape Testaccio | Rome Italy | Melania Bugiani

Water Works Park shortlist announced

Minneapolis Parks Foundation recently announced the shorlist  for the Water Works park schematic design project. The three shortlisted teams include

  • Gustafson Guthrie Nicol with VJAA and Interboro (Seattle/Minneapolis/New York);
  • SCAPE with Rogers Marvel (New York);
  • Team West 8 (Rotterdam/New York).

A five-member Designer Selection Committee chose the teams from a pool of 27 responses representing seven U.S. states and five European countries to the April RFP for schematic design for a new urban park on “America’s fourth coast.”

Continue reading Water Works Park shortlist announced

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