STUDENT PROJECT | The Compost Hub | Nicole Schneider

Systems theory has been an important method of thought in order to design landscapes in a sustainable manner. In our world today, humans are the leading influence on all systems; therefore, human impact is an integral part in how a sustainable system is conceived. Systems design is larger than the physical realm; it is the design of how our society acts, which reinforces how we think. As landscape architects, we have the opportunity to design new human activities within the landscape that become habit, a part of culture, and influence systems.
Continue reading STUDENT PROJECT | The Compost Hub | Nicole Schneider

This Week in Landscape | 28 July 2013

Another week in landscape links when food and farming (horizontal and vertical) are in the news

Vertical Farm at Ohare Airport

Chicago O’Hare Airport Vertical Farm | Flickr User chip_munk1

The Next Trend In Landscape Design: Foodscapes | Sustainable Business
“As food security becomes a bigger issue, landscape designers are being encouraged to change their focus from aesthetics to edible fruits and vegetables.” Article responding to
Eating the Landscape: Aesthetic Foodscape Design and its role in Australian Landscape Architecture [pdf] by Joshua Zeunert

The futuristic vertical farms that could solve Hong Kong’s space shortage | Sofia Mitra-Thakur | South China Morning Post
“As populations in China and Hong Kong grow and space for farming rapidly runs out, governments are looking for the answer to the question of how they will feed swelling ranks of people.”

In the future, we will all be home gardeners [future of home living] | PSFK
Riley’s company Windowfarms makes vertical hydroponic platforms for growing food in city windows.

Tending Vertical Gardens | Costance Rosenblum | NY Times
“These leafy expanses, sometimes flecked with flowers, can evoke anything from a tropical jungle to a Monet landscape. But because gardens were intended to be horizontal, not vertical, and because water, left to its own devices, flows down, not sideways, they are challenging to maintain.”

The Scale of Performance: Investigating a Range of Landscape Projects and Benefits | John Whalen, MLA Candidate and Jinki Kim, PhD, Assistant Professor, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign | Landscape Architecture Foundation
“Our team is working at three locations that vary substantially in size and project type, thus creating very interesting and distinct research questions regarding social, environmental and economic benefits.”

The Best Defense Against Catastrophic Storms: Mother Nature | Elizabeth Rauer | Stanford Woods
The study, published in the journal Nature Climate Change, offers the first comprehensive map of the entire U.S. coastline that shows where and how much protection communities get from natural habitats such as sand dunes, coral reefs, sea grasses and mangroves.

The Future of Mobility: Greening the Airport | Clare Lyster | Places – Design Observer
“To mitigate the toxicity of glycol-laced stormwater runoff, several north-latitude airports, including Buffalo Niagara International, have installed engineered wetlands…”

Our Public Infrastructure – Out of Sight, Out of Mind? | Gustavo Jacome | Stantec Is..
“As extreme weather events become more frequent, the question keeps coming up: Why can’t our infrastructure handle it? There are a few reasons…..”

How Better Urban Design Makes Us Healthier, Happier, and Sexier | Jeffrey Tumlin | GOOD
What happens when we redesign the human habitat to take walking out of daily life? Over 35 percent of Americans are now clinically obese. That’s partly because of diet, but also because we’ve designed our cities for cars.

IMAGE CREDIT |  Flickr User chip_munk1


Cumberland Corner | Nashville USA | Edward Krafcik

As a thriving community and precedent for brownfield redevelopment, Cumberland Corner | Nashville is envisioned as the new, hip destination centered on recreation and health. In blending a culture of fitness enthusiasm with sport, living, working, dining, healthcare, food production and a vibrant water front, the neighborhood becomes truly revolutionary.

Continue reading Cumberland Corner | Nashville USA | Edward Krafcik

Veennet – network of initiatives | Posad Spatial Strategies with MBDSO & Machiel Bakx

Veennet – network of initiatives | Posad Spatial Strategies with MBDSO & Machiel Bakx

Eo Wijers foundation organizes competitions every few years aiming to solve regional planning and landscape design issues in the Netherlands.  This year teams were asked to design strategies how to deal with population shrinkage in peripheral, on agriculture based areas in the north of the country.

Continue reading Veennet – network of initiatives | Posad Spatial Strategies with MBDSO & Machiel Bakx

La Moran | Caracas Venezuela | Enlace Arquitectura

La Moran | Venezuela | Enlace Arquitectura
In Venezuela 93% of the population live in cities, half of which inhabit urban slums. Upgrading initiatives to date have tended to focus on housing solutions to improve living conditions. However, graver issues affect the livelihood of slum dwellers on a daily basis. Alarmingly high homicide rates, frequent adolescent pregnancies and very high school dropout rates compromise every slum dweller´s quality of life and condemn them to a perpetual cycle of poverty. Health issues and low self dignity associated with living in severely degraded environmental conditions also diminish their livelihood. Improving the situation, therefore, goes beyond supplying mortar and brick to build better houses; it requires a holistic approach that seriously considers social and environmental deficiencies.

Continue reading La Moran | Caracas Venezuela | Enlace Arquitectura

The Rooftop Garden Climbs Down a Wall

Ken Belson of the New York Times has written an interesting piece about green walls which looks at the green wall as a source of food production. Belson talks to a varied number of designers, universities and manufacturers about the green walls as food production. He also states that at $500 a panel they aren’t for everyone.

Belson has a great quote he cites from Paul Mankiewicz, the executive director of the Gaia Institute in New York.

“We have 30 miles of rooftop in New York City and maybe 3,000 miles of walls,”

Read the article at the SOURCE: New York Times – The Rooftop Garden Climbs Down a Wall

TED Talk – Carolyn Steel – How food shapes our cities

Carolyn Steel recently gave a presentation at TED Global 2009 in Oxford, UK last July.

Architect and author Carolyn Steel uses food as a medium to “read” cities and understand how they work. In her book Hungry City she traces — and puts into historical context — food’s journey from land to urban table and thence to sewer. Cities, like people, are what they eat.

The video was recently posted and Carolyn gives a great presentation and some great insights.






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