New York City’s Largest Solar Energy Installation to be built at Freshkills Park

solar_JCFO

The Mayor of New York recently announced that the city will install the largest solar energy installation in New York City at Freshkills Parks. The installation is set to power 2,000 homes and will increase the City’s current renewable energy capacity by 50 percent. The Administration is moving forward with steps to officially map an additional 1,500 acres of Freshkills into parkland, officially bringing the total for Freshkills Park to 2,200 acres and bringing total parkland in New York City to more than 30,000 acres for the first time in history.

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model of urban healing | Fibo City | Perkins+Will

model of urban healing-Fibo City-Perkins+Will
fibroCITY was conceived and designed by the Houston office of Perkins+Will, who envision a pedestrian-oriented, community-driven environment that physically bridges over the city’s existing highway system as a means of reconnecting urban communities. This design entry for the Living City Design Competition responds to the history of highway development in Houston. The selected site, located at highway 288 south of downtown, was divided socially and economically by the highway’s development in the 1960s and 70s — conditions which still exist today.

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International Green Construction Code launched

Version 1.0 of the International Green Construction Code(IGCC) was launched by the International Code Council. Of interest to Landscape Architects is Chapter 4 – Site development and land use which

provides requirements for the development and maintenance of building and building sites that encourage natural resource conservation and environmentally responsible land use and development.

This chapter addresses soils, land use and conservation, storm water, irrigation, graywater, vegetation, building site management, transport, bicycle & vehicle parking, hardscape, vegetative roofs, lighting. Version 1.0 was undertaken with American Institute of Architects (AIA), ASTM International, ASHRAE, USGBC and IES with the inclusion of ASHRAE Standard 189.1 as an option for jurisdictional requirements. Version 1.0 of the code is open for public comment and then a Version 2.0 will be released in November 2010.

The IGCC aims to significantly reduce energy usage and greenhouse gasses. Enforcement of the code will improve indoor air quality and support the use of energy-efficient appliances, renewable energy systems, water resource conservation, rainwater collection and distribution systems, and the recovery of used water (greywater).

The IGCC emphasizes building performance, including features such as a requirement for building system performance verification and building owner education to ensure the best energy-efficient practices. A key feature of the new code is a section devoted to “jurisdictional electives” that will allow customization of the code beyond its baseline provisions to address local priorities and conditions.

Read more and download the IGCC (pdf or word format) at the [SOURCE: ICC] via Dexigner

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Masdar to use more PV’s to power city

Solar power plant (Serpa, Portugal)

Image via Wikipedia

With the recent drop in costs for photovoltaics (PV) and the effect of dust and haze on solar-thermal technology(the technology originally planned) has caused a rethink in supplying energy to Masdar. The utilities management company has decided to use 50% photovoltaics and 50% solar thermal due to costs. Although photovoltaics produce 20% less energy than solar thermal they will cost 33% less to install. The use of solar power will cost more than 2.5 times the cost per kwh than the current method generating energy via natural gas.

via the [SOURCE: The National]

CROSS POSTED ON UAELANDSCAPEARCHITECT.COM

White vs Green roofs at McGill

Henry Gass of McGill Daily reports

The fight for Montreal’s environmental future has recently reached new heights, as various environmental groups in the city promote the installation of energy-efficient green and white roofs.

Green rooftops, or rooftop gardens, are becoming more and more popular in Montreal, while white rooftops, flat surfaces with a white polymeric membrane stretched across, are just starting to be introduced.

Read the full article at the [SOURCE: McGill Daily - Green, white roofs come to campus]