Liefsgade Square | Copenhagen Denmark | Preben Skaarup Landscape


The municipality of Copenhagen decided to establish 3 full automatic underground car parks, located in urban areas where parking on surface was insufficient. The goals were to establish more parking area together with more open space for people in high density living areas.
Continue reading Liefsgade Square | Copenhagen Denmark | Preben Skaarup Landscape

Newark renewing naturally | Newark USA | Urban Data Design

Newark renewing naturally

Strategy:
Implement Environmentally Smart Beacons which newly symbolize Newark’s history, growth and promise as a modern city, diverse, eco conscious, and dedicated toward advancement. The creation and distribution of a comprehensive system will introduce VISUAL CULTURE, URBAN CULTURE, ECOLOGICAL CULTURE, HISTORICAL CULTURE, CLEAN INDUSTRY CULTURE and LEARNING CULTURE.

Continue reading Newark renewing naturally | Newark USA | Urban Data Design

‘Urban’ doesn’t have to mean more dense: Beyond DC

I just read J. Daniel Malouff  post about  how people can still live in higher density but aren’t getting the benefits of urban living at his blog Beyond DC .  I know this type of community is not just limited to Washington DC or the USA it’s happening all across the world where communities are living in higher density but are lacking the transport and services needed to make urban living actually livable. As Malouff states

….suburban apartments are simply preposterous. If you’re going to be building at that density anyway, then for goodness sake use an urban layout.

Read more at Beyond DC – ‘Urban’ doesn’t have to mean more dense

The Advantages of High Density

High Density cities have there advantages include convenience, access to transport, reduction in services & infrastructure. Prathima Manohar has outlined more advantages & challenges in a recent post – The Advantages of High Density at Urban Vision

Portland has room to move

According to OregonLive.com the Portland city has announced plans to accommodate another 1 million people by increasing the density of the existing urban areas. The Portland plans to encourage developers to build up not out to increase density and reduce the dependence on cars. By redeveloping of  existing  buildings and industrial zones to increase the city’s density will protect existing prime farmland and key natural areas. Although development groups see the plan as unrealistic as it doesn’t allow for industrial zones for job creation and the groups also question the costs of use of existing infrastructure.

However, I have to wonder whether these development groups are more worried about the higher cost of developing existing built areas rather than green field developments.

VIA OregonLive.com

Increased Density could mean reduced emissions

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Last week the NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL released a report titled DRIVING AND THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT: THE EFFECTS OF COMPACT DEVELOPMENT ON MOTORIZED TRAVEL, ENERGY USE, AND CO2 EMISSIONS stating that

Increasing population and employment density in metropolitan areas could reduce vehicle travel, energy use, and CO2 emissions from less than 1 percent up to 11 percent by 2050 compared to a base case for household vehicle usage……

The report continues to give examples of if 75% of all new and replacement housing units were developed at twice the density and people drive 25% less then then CO2 emissions would be reduced by 7-8% by 2030, 8-11% by 2050. However if only 25% of housing was developed at twice the density and drove 12% less then the reduction in CO2 would only be 1% by 2030 and 1.7% by 2050.

The report also outlined the obstacles with trying achieve 75% dwellings at twice the denisty including local growth, local zoning regulations, concerns about congestion and home values.

The report also stated that

Government policies to support more compact, mixed-use development should be encouraged, the report says. The nation is likely to set ambitious goals to address climate change and, given the large contribution of the transportation sector to greenhouse gas emissions, changes in land use may have to be part of the effort.  If so, land use changes should be implemented soon, because current development patterns will take decades to reverse

For more information about the report go to the NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL website.

SOURCE: NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL

IMAGE SOURCE: Flickr austrini (suburbia)  Flickr DrPleishner (city)

Seattle’s ‘new urbanism’: making smart, sustainable, stylish dwellings | Seattle Times Newspaper

Seattle’s ‘new urbanism’: making smart, sustainable, stylish dwellings | Seattle Times Newspaper

As questions of density, affordability and livability continue to drive discussions about how to design our urban worlds, architects, citizens and city officials are all looking for a shared sense of what the “new urbanism” means — whether and how to regulate, encourage and ultimately create the kind of built environment we want.

SOURCE: Seattle’s ‘new urbanism’: making smart, sustainable, stylish dwellings | Seattle Times Newspaper

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