Improvement works at Tai O 大澳改善工程 | Lantau Island, Hong Kong | Gravity Green

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Tai O is an old fishing village rich in heritage, and once home of salt industries. It is now developed as a rural fishing village, a popular tourist attraction with traditional residential and commercial streets. Tai O lies on a low lying coastal area on the western side of Lantau Island, the major priority was to resolve the flooding problems occasionally experienced in Tai O. The improvement works of Tai O (phase 1) aimed to preserve cultural heritage and natural attributes of Tai O, which included the construction of Riverwall at Yat Chung, upgrading the temple garden in front of Kwan Tai Temple and improvement works to the signage within the inner-core area.

Continue reading Improvement works at Tai O 大澳改善工程 | Lantau Island, Hong Kong | Gravity Green

OKRA`s Coastal Work starts on Katwijk


OKRA recently published a short video showing the construction work on the coast defence at Katwijk in the Netherlands. Alongside building the required coastal defence, the coast zone investments ensure that Katwijk remains a tourist destination and supporting the local economy of seaside towns. With the need to strengthen the Katwijk coast, care is taken to preserve the value of the existing town and, ultimately, how this can also be made stronger.
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How can Venice live with Climate Change?

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THE ETERNAL CITY?

Due to faster than expected sea level rise, scientists project that even the drastic intervention of the M.O.S.E. sea barrier project will only delay the permanent flooding of Venice by 100 to 200 years. In this future vision of drastically altered climate conditions, coastal cities such as Venice will have to physically and economically reinvent themselves in order to survive.

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This Week in Landscape | 2 March 2014

World Landscape Architecture’s weekly roundup of landscape related news for 23 February – 2 March 2014

Opinion: Can landscape architecture help resolve climate change? | Gavin Healy | The New Zealand Herald
Gavin Healy investigates ecological and landscape architecture projects created by the world’s top designers – and how they could help create a better planet.

EPA’s New Stormwater Calculator, Updated for Climate Change | J.Green | The Dirt
“The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently updated its national stormwater calculator, which estimates the amount of rainwater and runoff from any site in the U.S., to reflect best estimates on future climate change.”

City architects call for more green in the grey of Brisbane’s urban jungle | Kristina Olsson
“At one level, re-establishing the forests is a way for Brisbane to reclaim its uniqueness among other emerging cities. In the big picture, Brisbane’s future, like all of Australia’s, is tied to its embrace of its Aboriginal origins and its ongoing interactions, like those of city and forest,”

Profession needs to talk about potential for infrastructure not mitigation | Landscape Institute
“Alister Kratt, a partner at LDA Design, challenged the profession at the latest Landscape Futures debate, to ‘talk more positively about infrastructure’.”

Using nature as an example for gardening: Now, there’s an idea | Al Shay | Statesman Journal
“As Jensen rose through the ranks of the park system, he was given space to experiment with his “Prairie Style” within city parks. ”

UP Diliman: A Lab for Livability? | Eric S. Caruncho | Inquirer.net
“Originally, Philippine towns were planned like UP—where residents lived, worked, shopped and played within the same compact space.”
Continue reading This Week in Landscape | 2 March 2014

Bosco Verticale/Vertical Forest | Milan Italy | Boeri Studio

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Image Credit | Barreca & LaVarra

The Vertical Forest project aims to build high-density tower blocks with trees within the city. The first example of a Vertical Forest is currently under construction in Milan in Porta Nuova Isola area, part of a larger redevelopment project developed by Hines Italia with two towers which are 80 metres and 112 metres tall respectively, and which will be able to hold 480 big and medium size trees, 250 small size trees, 11.000 groundcover plants and 5.000 shrubs (the equivalent of a hectare of forest).

Continue reading Bosco Verticale/Vertical Forest | Milan Italy | Boeri Studio

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