e_co_llectiva | Athens Greece | Athanasios Polyzoidis & Katerina Petsiou

e_co_llectiva | Athens Greece | Athanasios Polyzoidis & Katerina Petsiou
In the project “e_co_llectiva” the public space of the streets and the vacant lots in the internal parts of the four building blocks is unified so as to create a single urban garden-park which promotes the concept of collective activity. This intervention is given the title ‘e_co_llectiva’ after ecology (eco), collectivity (collectiva) and new technologies (e).

Continue reading e_co_llectiva | Athens Greece | Athanasios Polyzoidis & Katerina Petsiou

This Week In Landscape | 4 March 2012

This weeks round-up of landscape news and views from around the web

Prospect Park (Flickr User wallyg)

We want a total ban on cars from Prospect Park,  Brooklynites tell city |  Simone Weichselbaum | New York Daily
But Brooklyn residents questioned why officials won’t ban motorists rather than cram cars into a 10-foot slice of pavement during the morning and evening commutes, the only time vehicles are allowed inside the park.

Suburban design: Pomp and paternalism | C.H. | The Economist
A review of  “Foreclosed: Rehousing the American Dream” at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York until July 13

Concentrating on building efficiency is Europe’s new climate-change mantra | Sandrine Dixson-Declève | The Guardian
Since buildings burn 40% of all the energy consumed, insulating them effectively could help the EU meet climate targets….

Harvard-PKU parallel course in eco-city planning | Bai Bing | Peking University
From February 10 to 19, 2 professors and 12 graduate students from Harvard Graduate School of Design (GSD), along with 16 graduate students from the College of Architecture and Landscape Architecture (CALA) of Peking University (PKU), completed a 10-day program under the guidance of Professor Yu Kongjian, president of CALA.

Gardening turns out to be very eco un-friendly | Roger Dobson & Jonathan Owen | The Independent
A report from the University of Reading and the RHS shows that gardens are a vital part of green infrastructure in cities however, it can contribute CO2 through the use of lawn mowers and peat.  Also here is the the abstract from ‘ The domestic garden: its contribution to urban green infrastructure’ by Cameron, R., Blanusa, T., Taylor, J., Salisbury, A., Halstead, A., Henricot, B. and Thompson, K.

SimCity 5 rumoured to launch in 2013 – Digital Spy
The last version of Sim City launched back in 2003 so news of an all new version slated to be launched in 2013 has caused a buzz in frustrated urban planners and designers  around the world.
See images of the rumoured game 

For more news during the week become a World Landscape Architecture fan on Facebook,  Join our LinkedIN group,  Follow us on Twitter @wlandscapearch or Weibo and then  Circle us on Google+

Send your links to contribute@worldlandscapearchitect.com

IMAGE CREDIT: Flickr User wallyg (Wally Gobetz)

 

UK Survey finds shortage of landscape architects

Green space skills: 2009 National employer survey findings, a survey commissioned by CABE and English Heritage, is the first to reveal the full extent of skills shortages in the green space sector in the UK. The report has found that 14.9% of national employers found landscape architects hard to recruit due to skills shortage. Landscape architects were also on top of the table as the hardest to recruit out of all the green space skills.

22% of  respondents from the Private sector stated that it was harder to find landscape architects whereas only 8.5 of respondents in the Public Sector  found it hard to find landscape architects due to a skills shortage.

Green space skills shows an urgent need to address the skills shortfall to tackle climate change. Planning, design and management are what are needed to help to adapt green spaces to a changing climate, and these were exactly the skills which employers felt their staff most lacked.

The report also identified several priorities to counter the shortage including:

- Develop and maintain a strong evidence base to make the case for investment in green space skills

- Improve the availability and quality of training, including continual professional development

- Increase awareness of the sector and the opportunities it offers, to encourage more people into the sector

Download the report at the [SOURCE:  CABE]

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Bond University to have new school of architecture

Bond University located on the Gold Coast of Australia is to introduce a new school of architecture due to the increasing demand for sustainably built environments. The new school will open in January 2011 in a newly built 6-star Green Star rated School of Sustainable Development building. The Soheil Abedian School of Architecture will offer 50 commencing places in 2011 for the six semester undergraduate program.

Professor George Earl, who will oversee the establishment of the School said, “The demand to design living environments that are sustainable and to address climate change issues are increasing exponentially.

“Climate change has required we evolve the way we design buildings.  Two years ago, the school undertook a survey of green rated building in Australia with 12 projects identified. The survey is currently being repeated but with 140 projects now participating.

Professor George Earl, who will oversee the establishment of the School said, “The demand to design living environments that are sustainable and to address climate change issues are increasing exponentially.

“Climate change has required we evolve the way we design buildings.  Two years ago, the school undertook a survey of green rated building in Australia with 12 projects identified. The survey is currently being repeated but with 140 projects now participating.

[SOURCE: Bond University]

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Australian architects think about cities in 2050 and beyond

The Australian Institute of Architects has announced a shortlist of proposals for the Australia Pavillion at the Venice Biennale. The shortlist of 24 was selected from 129 submissions addressing urban spaces in 2050 and beyond.

Some of the proposals include:

  • New cities of 50,000-100,000 in desert areas
  • Cities which feature a ‘tartan-like texture of pure urban areas (or cells), pure rural cells, and cells which are a hybrid of rural and urban’, providing a ‘vital flexibility for a sustainable future’.
  • Cities hugging the coast from Noosa to Geelong to accommodate population growth and the preferred coastal climate; connected by a ‘very fast train running from North Qld to Victoria; pockets of vertical sprawl; new cities in pristine locations such as Botany Bay and the Royal National Park.
  • Cities in which ‘within tightly controlled boundaries exist Multiple Cities‘. Cities which address issues such as: what if a city grows not out, but up or down? What if a city’s growth boundary is not on its periphery but at its heart? What if new planning initiatives were introduced governing the use of air space? ‘A Green City, where the top plane provides wind and solar energy to power (and cool) the multiple cities below’, as well as all food production.
  • Cities ‘woven into the landscape’ – balancing dense human settlement with flora and fauna biodiversity, with major roadways converted into natural landscape corridors.

The competition fired the imagination of Australia’s architects and designers, resulting in inspired, possible solutions and imaginative proposals addressing the critical issue of Australian urbanism – examining possibilities across the terrestrial, underwater and airborne realms.

The two-part ‘NOW + WHEN Australian Urbanism‘ exhibition will highlight three of Australia’s most interesting urban regions as they are ‘NOW’, before dramatically representing around seven futuristic urban environments from the competition as they may be ‘WHEN’ we reach 2050 and beyond.

Co-Creative Director and well-known Melbourne-based photographer John Gollings said: “The large number of entries and range of approach and philosophy exceeded expectations. We felt that more than 50 per cent of the entries could have made an important contribution to the Venice Architecture Biennale, and narrowing the selection down to 24 was difficult.

“Of great interest now, is that these varied ideas must be turned into tangible 3D models which can be screened as virtual, built projects for exhibition in the Australian Pavilion in Venice. This process will challenge the normal speculative imaging often produced by architects, and lead to new presentation techniques benefiting the whole profession as the world embraces 3D, virtual, and holographic media. From the test results with our 3D projectors, now running in Melbourne, the Australian pavilion at the 2010 Venice Biennale will be a standout attraction.”

The Creative Directors said those shortlisted were far more than hypotheticals. Each uniquely responded to future challenges including population growth, environmental degradation, dwindling resources and climate change. Each entry reflected a highly creative diversity of possibilities fused with a diversity of design that mapped out possible cities of the future.

12th Venice Architecture Biennale:
Vernissage: 26, 27, 28 August 2010;
Exhibition: 29 August – 28 November 2010

SOURCE: Australian Institute of Architects

RELATED NEWS STORY: Sydney Morning Herald – Living in the future, with under-harbour views

1 2 3 4